Skip to main content

Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

See other formats










4 

a 




\~\ 



>S*~2L 





I 




i^i 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



JUNE 23, 1958 



NUMBER 1 



Foreign Language Symposium Opens Today 

Five language specialists will participate in a three-day symposium on the 
problems of foreign languages during the University of Massachusetts Summer Ses- 
sion which opens today June 23 and extends through Aug. .30. 

The symposium, "Foreign languages and the national interest" is intended to 
reach a wide audience, with the major emphasis on language problems as a national 

and public issue* 

The symposium is part of an expanded 10-week Summer Session program for col- 
lege graduates and undergraduates to earn nearly a full semester 1 s work during the 



two sessions* 

The language program presented by the 
Romance Languages and German Departments 
will include major addresses, small conf- 
erences, question periods and laboratory 
demonstrations. The program Is under the 
auspices of the Carnegie Language Project. 

Speakers include: Stephen A. Freeman, 
vice president of Middlebury College who 
will address a convocation on July 9, at 
10:30 A.M. on "Expanding our horizons." 
Other speakers include Prof. J, Donald 
Bowen of the Foreign Service Institute of 
the Department of State, Washington, D.C., 
who will discuss"The Modern Language Assoc- 
iation College Language Project." 

Miss Marjorie Johnston of the Office 
of Education of the U.S. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare will describe 
her department's program of researcii and 
services in modern foreign languages. 

A demonstration of the language lab- 
oratory will be presented by Dr. Paul E. 
King, president of the Magnetic Recording 

Industries, N.Y, , „ 

(SEE LANGUAGE PAGE 4) 



Boys State Holds Session 

American Legion Department of 
Massachusetts, Inc., will hold 19^8 
Massachusetts Boys State at the 
University of Massachusetts from 
June 20 to June 28. This year I4.8O 
boys are enrolled who will be under 
the supervision and direction of 26 
counsellors and the administrative 
staff. These boys will be housed 
in Baker and Chadbourne Houses and 
the administrative staff will be 
housed in Butterfield House. Head- 
quarters this year will be in the 
food management area at the Dining 
Commons. Classes each day will be 
in Machmer Hall, Engineering Build- 
ing, Gunness Laboratory, Stockbridge 
Hall, French Hall, Chapel Auditorium, 
and Bowker Auditorium. 

(SEE BOYS STATE PAGE 4) 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 







THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION 

EDITOR .JOEL WOLFSON 

TYPIST .NANCY PARKER 

LAYOUT .JANET KALINOCTSKI 

Prexy Bids You Welcome 

Welcome to the campus of your State 
University during the first extended and 
expanded summer session. I hope you enjoy 
a pleasant and profitable stay in terms of 
your educational objectives . Please recog- 
nize that by moving ahead with your prog- 
ram during the summer session you are 
helping the taxpayers of the State by more 
adequately and efficiently utilizing the 
huge investment in plant we have in this 
beautiful valley. There are practical as 
well as philosophical objectives to almost 
every program. In addition to your studies 
I hope you take advantage of the glory and 
beauty of the surrounding natural area. 
Western Massachusetts is certainly one of 
the finest spots in the country* 



From The Director Of The Summer Session 

I should like to welcome all 
of the students attending the 1958 
Summer Session at the University. 
The University offers a variety of 
programs in numerous fields for 
sum .er study. Throughout the summer 
emphasis will be placed upon effec- 
tive learning under superior in- 
struction in a relaxed, pleasant 
atmosphere. In order to provide a 
broad educational experience, a num- 
ber of special lectures, seminars, 
conferences and excursions to fa- 
mous cultural centers in Massachu- 
setts, such as the Berkshire Music 
Festival, are also scheduled. In 
addition, indoor and outdoor extra 
curricular activities, designed to 
meet th~ varying needs of students 
of all age levels, are planned by 
the Assistant Director of Recre- 
ation and the Student Union Director. 

I hope your stay with us this 
summer will be both a pleasant and 
profitable educational experience. 
Pest wishes to you # ^ q * * 

Stanley F. Salnak 
Director 




3lj!nx& 



J. PAUL MATHER, 
President 







THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PACE 3 









Music Session Boon For High Schoolers 

Music instruction for high school youngsters will be offered this summer on 
the campus of the University of Massachusetts by a newly-formed organization, the 
Amherst Summer Music Center, it was announced recently. 

President J. Paul Mather said the program "Enables well-qualified high school 
students to obtain sound instruction which will be of great vaL ue.lt is hoped that 
the training will enhance the music program within the high schools of the Common- 



wealth. The facilities of the University 
will be made available to these students 
while they reside on our campus* 

"Extra curricular programs, including 
performances by groups of musicians and 
individual performers will add to the cul- 
tural life of the campus during the summer 
sessions," President Mather added. 

Dr. J. Clement Schuler will direct 
the center, which will offer instrumental 
and vocal instruction. 

Fred Waring, Arthur Fiedler and Sig- 
mund Spaeth are among eminent musicians 
named to the advisory council. 

Dr. Schuler is director of instrumen- 
tal music at Amherst College; director of 
the Department of Music Education of Am- 
herst Public Schools and director of in- 
•trumental music of Deerfield Academy. He 
organized the "Kids from Home" tours for 
the Department of Defense touring a quar- 
ter of a million miles, entertaining a half 
million servicemen. 

(SEE MUSIC PAGE 4) 

PROGRAM - JUNE 24 to JULY 4 

TUESDAY, JUNE 21+ 



5:30 PM 



Chicken Fry at Rhododen- 
dron Gardens. 
Commonwealth Room of Stu- 
dent Union in case of in- 
clement or threatening 
weather. After dinner, 
there will be square dan- 
cing. Cold watermelon will 
be served. Your tickets 
will be collected before 
you are served dinner. 



THURSDAY, JUNE 26 



8:15 PM 



Movie 
Union 



it 



Pinky" - Student 



FRIDAY, JUNE 27 
8:00 PM 



Festival, 
under the 



Country Dance 
Folk dancing 
stars on Alumni Field. 
Hundreds of gaily attired 
couples of all Qr;e3 make 
this a successful affair 
each year. Hicks Gymna- 
sium in case of rain. Pre- 
sent your ticket at the 
gate* 



Testing Program 

Members of the Class of 1962. 
will be brought to the campus in 
groups of approximately two hundred 
throughout the summer months. An 
orientation to the academic scene, 
a program of aptitude and placement 
testing, and course registration 
will be completed during the two 
and one-half days each group is on 
campus. Counselors to interpret the 
test scores and to advise students 
will be responsible for planning 
the academic programs of approxi- 
mately 10 to Hi students. 

Counselors will also be expec- 
ted to meet informally on Saturday 
with parents of freshmen, for whom 
a special program is being planned. 
The preliminary schedule includes 
lunch at the Dining Commons with 
brief meetings at the Student Union 
either before or after lunch. 

Library Hours 

Hugh Montgomery, University 
Librarian, has announced the follow- 
ing summer hours for the Library 
for the period June 23 - August 30: 
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 
£:00 p.m. Closed Saturday and Sun- 
day all day. Saturday exceptions 
ere July 26 and August 30 when the 
Library will then be open from 8:00 
a.m. - 1:00 p.m. The Library will 
be closed all day Friday, July \\.. 



MONDAY, JUNE 30 
6:30 PM 



at Mt. 

Holyoke 

Busse3 



Valley Players-"* 
Park Casino, in 
"Petticoat Fever" 
will leave from the Stu- 
dent Union at 6:30 PM. 
Play begins at 8: 30. Note: 
Please sign up at the 
desk in the Union lobby 
by Friday, June 27» 



FRIDAY, JULY l* 

2:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Music Cen- 
ter Concert, Paul Yoder 
conducting. Student Union 
terrace or ballroom de- 
pending on weather con- 
dition::. 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 4 






Business School Accepted By AACBS 

The University School of busi- 
ness Administration has been accep- 
ted as a member of the American 
Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Business officials here were no- 
tified. 

Organized in 1916, the AACBS 
is the only accrediting agency for 
collegiate schools of business in 
the country, with a membership of 
85 schools • 

School of Business Administra- 
tion Dean H.B. Kirshen received no- 
tification and congratulations fl on 
the quality of operations of your 
school." 



Symposium Briefs 

1. This symposium at the specific 
request of most speakers, is 
primarily intended to reach an 
audience composed of students on 
campus and an off -campus general 
public, and not "language spe- 
cialists" or teachers. Mr. King's 
demonstration should certainly 
interest the public since most 
future language courses will 
make use of laboratory tech- 
niques. (High schools in New 
England have already adopted 
them. ) 

2. The symposium emphasizes a na- 
tional problem: there are not 
enough people who can use anoth- 
er language, whether for general 
or scientific purposes. Valuable 
scientific articles have long 
been received but unread in this 
country because they are in a 
foreign language. Prestige can 
be built up in part by the abil- 
ity to handle one or more lan- 
guages: the State Department has 
recently established strict reg- 
ulations in this direction. Those 
who have spoken out publicly in 
this need include President Ei- 
senhower (most recently at the 
US Naval Academy graduation) , Ex- 
President of Harvard and ex-am- 
bassador James B # Conant, and 
Rear Admiral Hyman Rickover. 

3. The UMass Symposium was designed 
to bring a group of specialists 
of varied specific interests to 
the campus to underline current 
national needs. 



Heywood Named 

Robert E. Heywood, a certified 
public accountant who holds a mas- 
ter's degree in accounting from the 
University of Illinois has been 
named assistant treasurer of the 
University of Massachusetts, Pres- 
ident J. Paul Mather announced re- 
cently. 

As assistant to Treasurer Ken- 
neth W. Johnson, beginning July 1, 
Mr. Heywood will be responsible for 
supervising the University 1 s re- 
ceipts and disbursements operation, 
currently approaching $12,000,000 
a year. He will also supervise the 
administration of scholarships, stu- 
dent aid, and foundation grants. 



LANGUAGE Cont. 

Prof. Archibald T. MacAllister, Dir- 
ector of Language Study at Princeton Univ- 
ersity will speak on "Crisis and the road 
ahead." 

The language program is one of sev- 
eral institutes to be offered this summer 
at the University of Massachusetts. 

Under the expanded program at the 
University, between six and eight credits 
may be earned in each five-week session. 



BOYS STATE Cont. 

Boys State Citizens are given 
an intensive course on Town, City, 
County and State government as it 
applies to the State of Massachu- 
setts. At the close of the session 
on June 28 one delegate and one al- 
ternate will be selected to repre- 
sent Massachusetts at Boys Nation 
in Washington, D.C., which will be 
held at a later date in the summer. 



MUSIC Cont. 

Assisting him this summer will be 
Jack Dolph, associated for 25> years as pro- 
ducer of the Fred Waring show and S. Lee 
Varker of Greenfield, who has worked as 
film director for WCAU-TV, Philadelphia; 
film and program director for radio-TV in 
Burlington and promotion manager of WMUR- 
TV, Manchester. 




i^i mnnrr^&r 





University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



! 



Volume 1 



June 30. T958 



Mnmkor 9 



Third Annual Humanities Seminar Brings Famous Political, 

Social and Economic Leaders Here For Three Day Parley 

The Third Annual American Humanities Seminar will meet at 
the University of Massachusetts and the Lord Jeffrey Inn on 
July llj., 15> and 16, to discuss the problem, "Humanists, Scien- 
tists and Technologists in an Industrial Civilization," This 
Seminar is sponsored by the Humanities Center for Liberal Edu- 
cation, Cooperating is the President's Committee on Scientists 
and Engineers • 



Scientists, technologists and 
humanists together with leaders of 
labor, industry and government will 
discuss the question: "In this time 
of the Satellites how may men of 
thought in the most crucial sectors 
of American life, work confidently 
together as allies in the democra- 
tic enterprise, to insure the kind 
of citizen whose knowledge and wis- 
dom will be able to cope with the 
demands of the future?" 

k IMPORTANT POINTS 
In conjunction with this question 
four problems will also be examined, 
"1, Values: some major premises. Do 
we see eye to eye? 

2. Images: the scientist, technolo- 
gist and humanist as they see them- 
selves, as they see one another, as 
the public sees them. How shape 
images of integrity and common re- 
sponsibility? 

3» Lags: the lags between the know- 
ledge of specialist and the know- 



ledge of citizens. How enable the 
citizen to apply intelligently the 
knowledge at the new frontiers? 
J|, Persons: the literate American 
of I98I4. — not a stereotype but 
tough-minded and wisely confident.. 
How may scientists, humanists and 
technologists, together with men of 
affairs, help the citizen meet the 
challenge?" 

GRAHAM KEYNOTER 

Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg, Ex- 
ecutive Director, has announced that 
Frank P. Graham, distinguished edu- 
cator, statesman and humanitarian, 
will give the keynote address. His 
subject will be: "The Man of Thought, 
Democratic Society, and the Scienti- 
fic Revolutions," 

Other prominent participants 
in the Seminar are: Professor George 
Boas, retired Chairman of the Phil- 
osophy Dept, at Johns Hopkins Univ- 
ersity; Dr, Glenn Christensen,Dean f 
College of Arts and Science, Lehigh 

(SEE HUMANITIES PAGE 3) 




THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 

THE mOI!B COLLEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



EDITOR .JOEL WOLFSON 

TYPIST .NANCY PARKER 

LAYOUT JANET KALINOWSKI 









Old Chapel To Become 
Campus Religious Center 



Long range planning has begun 
at the University of Massachusetts' 
to convert one of the campus land- 
marks, Old Chapel, into an all-faith 
religious center. 

The trustees have authorized 
the administration to assign the 
building as a religious center upon 
completion of the two million dol- 
lar Liberal Arts Classroom building* 
Construction of this building is 
expected to start this month to be 
completed in two years. 

PRIVATE FUNDS SOUGHT 

Private funds will be so'ught 
to renovate the building to provide 
expanded facilities for the three 
chaplains, in their work of spiri- 
tual counseling* 

In endorsing the project, Pre- 
sident J, Paul Mather states: "The 
chaplains have performed a tremen- 
dous and valuable service by salva- 
ging a great many students who were 
emotionally disturbed or discour- 
aged during their educational car- 
eers. »Their present quarters do not 
lend themselves to the kind of spir- 
itual dignity and atmosphere that 
is essential to a fully adequate 
religious counseling program. 

The concept of a religious 
center has been endorsed by the 



Student Senate and the 
class of 195>8 voted to 
volving altar, similar 
Cornell University, as 
gift. 



graduating 

give a re- 

to one at 

its class 



Chaplains have recommended 
that facilities include offices for 
counseling; rooms for associates and 
secretaries; separate offices for 
the respective student organiza- 
tions; an office for representatives 
of faiths not now served by a chap- 
lain; small rooms for worship for 
Jewish, Roman Catholic and Protes- 
tant groups and an additional all- 
faith room. Other facilities would 
include the auditorium which could 
be converted into a chapel for ser- 
vices; meeting rooms for group e- 



vents; a library, lounge, activity 
workshop and kitchen. 

Old Chapel was built as a li- 
brary and worship center in l88£ at 
a cost of ^ 1,000. Religious ser- 
vices were conducted in the chapel 
until 191^ and then were moved to 
the larger auditorium, Bowker, part 
of Stockbridge Hall, completed that 
year. Old Chapel was used solely 
as a library until 1935 when Good- 
ell Library was completed. In 1936 
it was renovated for use as class- 
rooms and faculty offices. 

UMass Plays Host To 
Full Season Of Conferences 

A full season of professional, 
labor, educational conferences are 
scheduled here at the University. 

June 29 - July 2, Grange Youth Lead- 
ership School; June 29 - August 9 
Amherst Summer Music Center; June 
30 - July 2, State Vo-Agri culture 
Teachers; 

June 30-July 11, Amherst Girl Scouts 
Day Camp; July 7 - 11$ State I4.-H 
Week 

July 8 - 10, Carnegie Foundation 
Symposium; July 11 - 13 > New England 
Camera Council; July ll\. - 16, Amer- 
ican Humanities Seminar; July 20 - 
July 25, Massachusetts Cosmetolo- 
gists Association;July 23 - Aug. 6, 
Foreign Student Program. 

August 1-3, Massachusetts Amal- 
gamated Meat Cutters and Butcher 
Workmen Institute; Aug. 2 - 3# Wes- 
tern Massachusetts, International 
Ladies Garment Workers Union; Aug. 
7 - 9# Apiculture Conference; Aug. 
26 - 29, Massachusetts Assessor's 
Association. 

Foreign Language Symposium 

The Departments of German and Romance 
Languages $ under the auspices of the 
Carnegie Language Projeot, will present 
a three-day symposium on the problems of 
foreign languages in the national soene. 

Don't forget the dates III 

July 8 f 9, and 10. 






Provost McCune On "Exper 

Presidents of Amherst, Mount 
Holyoke and Smith colleges and the 
University of Massachusetts have 
assigned members of their staffs to 
serve as a committee to develop 
plans "for a new experimental col* 
lege aimed at producing education 
of the highest quality at a minimum 
cost per student body as new methods 
of instruction and new administra- 
tive procedures can make possible," 
The committee, supported by a grant 
from the Fund for the Advancement 
of Education, will spend the time 
from June into September exploring 
the problem, A report to the four 
presidents will be presented by 
November l£, 19£8, 

Committee members include: 
Cesar L. Barber of Amherst College, 
Donald Sheehan of Smith College, 
Stuart M. Stoke of Mount Holyoke 
College, and Shannon McCune, Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Provost, 
Chairman, 

"The committee is purposely 
initiating its work with no pre- 
conceived ideas. In finding its way 
to a plan for a new college, it will 
try to re-think the basic assump- 
tions underlying American education 
and to re-evaluate accepted prac- 
tices and techniques. To this end, 
the help of a variety of consult- 

SU Building Hours 

June 23, 1958 - August 16, 1958 . 

Saturday, Building hours= 8:00 a,m,- 
7:30 p. itw 

Poods - 8:30 a,m, - 7:00 p,m» 
Store - 8:30 a,m. - 12:00 noon (Ex- 
cept for special arrangements) 
Games - 10:00 a,m, - 7:00 p,m, 

Sundays - Building and facilities 
available during this period and 
the summer program will be announ- 
ced elsewhere in the special bulle- 
tin. The building will be avail- 
able for meetings, conferences, lun- 
cheons, dinners, carry-out picnic 
arrangements and catering. If in- 
terested in the above list, please 
contact the Schedule Clerk at the 
Lobby Counter, Also, available 
during the summer period will be 
television, informal dancing, check 
cashing service and lost and found. 

Building Hours- Monday through Fri- 
day - 7:00 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. 
Pood Service- 7:30 a,m # - 10:00 p,m # 
University Store- 8:30 a # m # - 5:00- 
P#nu 
Games - 10:00 a # m, - 10:00 p,m. 



will 
the 
size 
and 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 3 

imental College" Committee 

ants will be enlisted. The plan 
include all major aspects of 

new institution: curriculum, 
and character of student body 

faculty, physical facilities, 
finances, fl Dr. McCune states. 

The plan will be aimed at de- 
veloping an institution located in 
close proximity to th$ four insti- 
tutions, drawing upon them in its 
development, and serving as a ve- 
hicle for cooperative projects of 
interest to them. The institution 
envisaged is not a make-shift de- 
veloped as a result of current de- 
mands, but a college, experimental 
and new, in which all four institu- 
tions, would be able to take pride. 
The presidents of the four institu- 
tions, of course, undertake no com- 
mitment at the initiation of the 
project to put the plan for a new 
college into actual effect. There 
is likewise no commitment on the 
part of the Fund for the Advance- 
ment of Education or the Ford Foun- 
dation to provide further support • 
Whether or not a new institution 
evolves from the plans, the commit- 
tee and its sponsors hope that the 
planning operation itself will have 
value for the four institutions and 
American higher education, the 
chairman stated. 



HUMANITIES Continued 

University; William G, Caples, Vice- 
President, Inland Steel Co,; F,W, 
Wormald, Associate Director, Assoc- 
iation of American Colleges; Paul L # 
Millane, Editor, College Dept,, 
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.;A,M» 
Sullivan, Editor, Dun's Review and 
Modern Industry ; Sidney Sulkin, 
Associate Editor, Changing Times ; 
George E, Probst, Executive Direc- 
tor, Thomas Alva Edison Foundation; 
Henry Sams, Director of the Summer 
Quarter, University of Chicago; Pro- 
vost Harvey R. Davis, State Univer- 
sity of Iowa; and, Professor William 
N. Locke, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology* 

The American Humanities Semin- 
ar is an annual function of the Hu- 
manities Center for Liberal Educa- 
tion, The first Seminar, with the 
College English Association and the 
University of Massachusetts as co- 
sponsors, was held in 1956„ 



ill 



bUMMtiK UULLhXrlAN hAUE 4 

Program July 4 - July 13 



FRIDAY, JULY fa. 



2:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Music Cen- 
ter Concert, Paul Yoder 
conducting. Student Union 
terrace or ballroom de- 
pending on weather con- 
ditions. 



TUESDAY, JULY 8 



8:00 
9:30 



PM ton 



Band Concert, American 
Legion Band of Northamp- 
ton, Alfred Purseglove 
conducting. 

Lawn, South side of Union 
Wednesday, July 9 in case 
of rain. 

TUESDAY JULY 8 to THURSDAY JULY 10 

Carnegie Language Project 
(The Departments of German and Ro- 
mance Laiguages under the auspices 
of the University of Massachusetts 
Carnegie Language Project.) 

TUESDAY JULY 8 



2:30 PM 



8:00 PM 



Dr. Paul E # King, Presi- 
dent, Magnetic Recording 
Indus tries , N.Y. "Language 
Teaching Comes of Age." 
Council Chambers, Student 
Union. 

Council Chambers. Profess- 
or J. Donald Bowen, The 
Foreign Service Institute 
of the State Department. 
" The Modern Language 
Association College Lan- 
guage Project. 11 



WEDNESDAY JULY 9 

11 Am Commonwealth Room, Student 

Union. Convocation add- 
ress. Dr. Stephen A. Free- 
man, Vice President Mid- 
dlebury College and Di- 
rector of the Middlebury 
Language School. "Expan- 
ding Our Horizons" 

2:30 PM Council Chambers. Dr. Ar- 
chibald MacAllister Pro- 
fessor of Italian and Di- 
rector of Language In- 
struction at Princeton 
University. "Crisis and 
the Road Ahead." 

Summer. I.D. cards will be used for 
identification in the Union build- 
ing. 



Worrying About Grave Subjects 

(ACP) — University of Denver's 
CLARION views with alarm this de- 
velopment: 

Every so often we stop worry- 
ing about Grave Subjects in order 
to worry about trivia. 

For instance, right now we 1 re 
worried about steaks. 

We've always been in favor of 
steaks, cooked medium rare, occa- 
sionally in mushrooms, but never 
with sauce. 

Recently we read that since 
1955 the U.S. Government has per- 
mitted meat packers to use enzymes 
in tenderizing steaks. Where pre- 
viously corn-fed beef, carefully 
aged, was a requisite for a tender 
steak, now the packing companies 
have only to dip tougher, leaner 
pieces in an enzyme solution. 

One meat packer is even test- 
ing the feasibility of injecting 
tenderizing enzyme directly into 
steers before they are slaughtered. 

Now all this is satisfactory, 
except for one thing that bothers 
us. We could look it up, but we're 
afraid. In the back of a cluttered 
mind, we seem to remember a high 
school definition of enzymes .Aren't 
they what we use to digest food? 

Which is why we contemplate a 
pre-digested steek and wonder if it 
wouldn't be best to go back to 
Grave Subjects. 



8:00 PM 



Council Chambers .Dr. Mar- 
jorie Johnston, Office of 
Education of the United 
States Department of 
Health. Education and Wel- 
fare. "The Office of Edu- 
cation Program of Re- 
search Services in Mod- 
ern Foreign Languages." 



THURSDAY, JULY 10 



2:30 PM 



8:15 PM 



Council Chambers. Round 
table Discussion. All 
speakers participating. 

Movie "Winterset" Student 
Union 




SUNDAY JULY 13 



2:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Music Cen- 
ter concert: orchestra 
and chorus. Student Union 
terrace or ballroom de- 
pending on weather con- 
ditions. 




k^j rY^irv^i 










I 




r^i 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



JULY 7, 1958 



Number 3 



Language Specialists Meet Here 



A symposium, "Foreign Languages and the National Interest", 
will be presented by the Departments of German and Romance 
Languages July 8, 9 and 10* Concerned with the development of 
language laboratories, techniques of teaching languages in the 
past and present, it will be of interest to students and fa- 
culty. Here is a chance to hear the experts talk about a pro- 
blem which concerns us all at a time of growing concern with 
other countries and their ideas* 
Stephen A. Freeman, vice-presi- 
dent of Middlebury College will de- 
liver the convocation address for 
the foreign language symposium open- 
ing July o at the University • 

Dr. Freeman, director of the 
Middlebury Language Schools, will 
speak July 9 at 10:20 in the Stu- 
dent Union on "Expanding our hori- 
zons," He has served as acting pre- 
sident of Middlebury, has been vice 
president since 191+3* director of 
the Language Schools since 19^.6 • 

A graduate of Harvard University 
where he also earned his M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees, D r . Freeman holds 
honorary doctor of humanities de- 
gree from the University of Vermont 
and an honorary doctor of laws de- 
gree from Norwich University.He has 
twice served as president of the 
National Federation of Modern Lan- 
guage Teachers Assoc, and president 
of the Federation of French Alli- 
ances in the United States. 




Stephen A. Freeman 

The symposium opens July 8 at 
2:30 with a talk by Dr# Paul E. 
King, president of Magnetic Record- 
ing Industries. He will trace the 
development of language labora- 
tories with a demonstration and dis- 
play of laboratory devices. 

(SEE LANGUAGES PAGE I4.) 



— 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 



Summer In Amherst 

Students at the University of 
Massachusetts in the summertime 
have a rare opportunity, not only 
to use the wonderful facilities of 
our university, but also to spend 
part of the summer in a beautiful 
town* Amherst is beautiful, and it 
can be interesting* 

A tour of the town is worth the 
time of any student. Maybe you're 
a city dweller originally, and this 
business of living in a small town 
is a new experience for you. Give 
it a chance. Explore the country 
roads and see firsthand the n nature" 
you read about in poetry courses 
and study scientifically in botany, 
forestry, or agriculture courses. 

You'll find, at the center, an 
unusual town library, The Jones Li- 
brary, Inc. Maybe you've noticed 
it already, the charming stone buil- 
ding across the street from the Am- 
herst Theatre. Go in and browse a- 
round. The library has an exhibit 
right now which should be of inter- 
est to all of us, an exhibit of Ro- 
bert Frost material. There are 
striking photographs of the famous 
poet who once made his home in Am- 
herst, copies of his books, and sam- 
ples of his manuscripts. The dis- 
play will be there until July 31* 

The Mead Art Building at Amherst 



College is open all 



■ ummer. 



The 



hours are 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to h 
p.m. weekdays. On display now are 
paintings recently acquired by the 
college. The building itself is 
worth the walk across town. 

There are many historical land- 
marks in Amherst. Emily Dickinson, 
America's foremost woman poet, lived 
here. You can see her house and her 

grave too if you like to visit 

graveyards! Eugene Field and Helen 
Hunt Jackson lived here. Maybe 
you'll come across their houses. 
Hers is marked. Ask at the Jones Li- 
brary for a pamphlet listing other 
famous spots in our lovely town. 

This paper will try to keep you 
posted on events of local interest: 
band concerts on the common, art ex- 
hibits, dances any small town ac- 
tivities which might furnish relax- 
ation and a change of scenery and 
pace after classes and studying. 
Let's make Amherst "our town" dur- 
ing these summer weeks. 



THE SUMMER COLjlEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Adviser ••.•••..Doris E. Abramson 

Typist Nancy Parkor 

Layout •••••••• Janet Kalinowski 

Reporters •• Peter St # Lawrence 

Paul Leathe 



Make Way For Progress 

The 75 year old Drill Hall, one 
of the few remaining wooden buil- 
dings on the University of Massachu- 
setts campus has been razed to make 
way for construction of the new Li- 
beral Arts clasrroom building. 

Built originally for military 
training purposes in 1883 at a cost 
of $6500, the two-story structure 
has been used for men's and women's 
physical education and its central 
gymnasium was the scene of alumni 
gatherings, banquets and dances. 

Drill Hall underwent several 
periods of alterations and addi- 
tions, beginning in 1895 with the 
addition of a gun shed # It was ex- 
tensively remodeled in 1927 and a 
new floor was installed in 193f>» 

Men's athletic program was con- 
ducted there until the Curry Hicks 
Physical Education building was 
completed in 193X* 

Women's physical education clas- 
ses were held in Drill Hall from 
1927 until 1957 • This fall, the 
new Women's Physical Education 
building will be opened. 



APA Approves Psychology Program 

The graduate training program in 
clinical psychology at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts has received 
professional recognition by the A- 
merican Psychological Association. 

Prof. Claude C. Meet, head of the 
department, has been notified by the 
Committee on Evaluation of the Edu- 
cational and Training Board of APA 
that the graduate program has been 
approved. 

The American Psychological Asso- 
ciation is the only approving or 
accrediting agency for graduate 
programs in clinical psychology and 
recognizes officially that Univer- 
sity graduate students who meet re- 
quirements for a Ph. D. in this 
field have completed a high-stan- 
dard four-year program. 

SEE PSYCHOLOGY Page 4 



J 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 3 









Humanities Seminar 

The third annual American Human- 
ities Seminar will be held on our 
campus July llj-16. The sponsors are 
The Humanities Center for Liberal 
Education, The University of Massa- 
chusetts, cooperating with The Pre- 
sidents Committee on Scientists 
and Engineers • 

Here are some advance comments 
on the Seminar by eminent scien- 
tists, technologists and humanists: 

The subject is both timely and 
important. • • 

Jonas E. Salk,M.D. , School 
of Medicine, U of Pittsburgh 

...all best wishes for the best of 
success in your wonderful endeavor. 

Theodore Hesburgh; Pres. f 
University of Notre Dame 

... covers a series of exceedingly 
important subjects, which today are 
of quite as great concern to scien- 
tists and engineers as they are to 
other branches of learning. •• 

Thorndike Saville; Director, 
Science and Technology Center of 
Study, University of Florida 

Looks like a marvelous gathering. 

Hiram Haydn; Editor, The 
American Scholar . 

I am sure it will be a most stimu- 
lating and fruitful three days c 

Lester W. Nelson;Assistant Vice 
President, Fund for the Advancement 
of Education 

I am vitally interested, and would 
not miss it if I weren f t already 
tied up # 

Harry J. Skornia; Executive Di- 
rector, National Assoc, of Educa- 
tional Broadcasters 



GOLF 

The Ajnherst Golf Club is loca- 
ted on South Pleasant Street. Green 
fees are ftl.50 for weekdays and 
'>2.50 for Saturday, Sunday, and Hol- 
idays. 



An outdoor pool is located on 
Memorial Field in Amherst. There is 
an admission fee. 



Veterans Take Note 

Veterans continue to show a 
high degree of scholastic achieve- 
ment at the University of Massachu- 
setts, a survey by George E. Emery, 
veterans 1 coordinator, shows. 

With veterans accounting for 
38 per cent of the men graduating 
this spring, 63 per cent of honor 
graduates were veterans. 

All three men receiving B.A. 
degrees magna cum laude in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences were vet- 
erans. Of the nine men graduating 
cum laude, six were veterans. In 
the same college, of the four men 
receiving B. S. degrees, magna cum 
laude, one was a veteran. Of the 
four men graduating cum laude, three 
were veterans • 

Two veterans received the high- 
est honors granted in the College 
of Agriculture, both magna cum laude. 
Of the three men receiving cum 
laudes, one was a veteran. 

Veterans took three of the six 
cum laude degrees granted to men in 
the School of Business Administra- 
tion. 



(SEE VETERANS PAGE Lj.) 



Management Workshop Opens 

A workshop on Management For To- 
day 1 s Families, offered by the 
School of Home Economics, will begin 
Wednesday July 9 and run through 
Saturday July 26. 

This workshop is planned for home 
economics teachers, extension work- 
ers, social workers, and others who 
counsel young people and adults. 
Problems related to family econo- 
mics, work simplification, and de- 
cision making in the home will be 
considered. Sample questions: Hov 
do we manage to shorten work hours 
20 that we may have more time for 
leisuro?How do we manage to stretch 
dollars to meet our needs? 

Work Shop leaders will be Mary 
Jane Strattner, professor in Home 
Economics Education; Barbara Snow- 
nan, formerly of Cornell University 
end nov; Home Economics Program Lea- 
der, Extension Service; and Barbara 
Higgins, specialist in Family Eco- 
nomics, Extension Service. 



Coming Events 

TUESDAY JULY 8 

2:30 PM Dr. Paul E, King, Presi- 
dent, Magnetic Recording 
Industries, N.Y. "Language 
Teaching Comes of Age ,f 
Council Chambers, Student 
Union. 



8:00 
to 

9:30 PM 



Band Concert, American 
Legion Band of Northamp- 
ton, Alfred Purseglove 
conducting* 

Lawn, South 3ide of Union 
Wednesday, July 9 in case 
of rain. 



TUESDAY JULY 8 to THURSDAY JULY 10 

Carnegie language Project 
(The Departments of German and Ro- 
mance Languages under the auspices 
of the University of Massachusetts 
Carnegie Language Project,) 

MONDAY, JULY H4. to WEDNESDAY JULY 16 

American Humanities Sem- 
inar and University of 
Massachusetts in coopera- 
tion with the President's 
Committee on Scientists 
and Engineers, 

MONDAY JULY H4. 



1:30 PM 



Student Union Ballroom, 
Keynote address by Dr, 
Frank Graham, former Pre- 
sident of the University 
of North Carolina pres- 
ently with UNESCO, "The 
Man of Thought, Democratic 
Society, and the Scienti- 
fic Revolutions 11 



VETERANS Continued 

In the School of Engineering, 
a veteran earned the only cum laude 
in chemical engineering; all three 
magna cum laude electrical engin- 
eering degrees were earned by vet- 
erans and of the nine cum laude de- 
grees granted in electrical engin- 
eering, six were earned by veterans. 

In the Division of Physical 
Education, the two cum laude degrees 
were earned by veterans. 

Of the 32 undergraduate men 
elected to the honor society, Phi 
Kappa Phi, 21 were veterans.. Of the 
11 men elected to Sigma Xi, honorary 
scientific society, seven were vet- 
erans. 

Departmental honors were a- 

warded to II4. men; of these six were 
veterans. 



THE SUIfriER COLLEGIAK PAGE 4 

Chamber Music In Hadley 

Anyone interested in chamber mu- 
sic will want to be in Hadley at 
the Porter-Phelps-Huntington House 
July 12 at I4. pm. to hear the North- 
ampton String Quartet, 

If you get there at 3 P»m., you 
will have time for a tour of the 
historic house. Dr. James Lincoln 
Huntington, curator, will take you 
on a conducted tour of this unique 
colonial home. Tea will be served 
on the back veranda, and the recital 
will be in the music shed. 

This is the third summer of re- 
citals at the famous house in Had- 
ley, and the Northampton String 
Quartet is one of the most popular 
groups to play there. Students of 
American history and lovers of good 
music find these recitals of great 
interest. There is a small admis- 
sion charge. 



LANGUAGES Continued 

On July 8 at 8 p.m., Prof. J, 
Donald Bowen, associate professor 
of linguistics of the Foreign Ser- 
vice Institute of the Department of 
State will report on the Modern 
Language Assoc. College Language 
project. Archibald T. MacAllister, 
professor of Italian and director 
of language instruction at Prince- 
ton University will speak July 9 at 
2:30 on "Crisis and the road ahead 1 . 1 

Dr # w arjorie Johnston, specialist 
in foreign languages for the U.S, 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare will describe her depart* 
ment's program of research and ser- 
vices in modern foreign languages 
during the evening session at 8, 

The symposium concludes July 10 
with a round table discussion at 
2:30 when the symposium will be 
summarized and a discussion con- 
ducted of principal problems. 



PSYCHOLOGY Continued 

Approval by the national asso- 
ciation also makes possible cooper- 
ative arrangements with the Veter- 
ans Administration Psychology Train- 
ing Program enabling University 
graduate students to work in VA fa- 
cilities. Also available are four 
year U.S. Public Health Service 
grants for qualified students. 







i^j mor^oer 









I 




r^j 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



JULY 14, 1958 



NUMBER 4 



Humanities Seminar Opens July 14 



President Eisenhower's Committee on Scientists and Engineers is coopera- 
ting in bringing together leaders from important areas of American life at 
the University of Massachusetts July Hj-,15> and 16 for the Third Annual Amer- 
ican Humanities Seminar • With the President's Committee cooperating, the 
seminar is being sponsored by the Humanities Center for Liberal Education 
and the state university. Its theme will be: "Humanists, Scientists and, 
Technologists in the Age of Science. fl 



Prank P. Graham, former U.S. Sen- 
ator and now United Nations repre- 
sentative for India and Pakistan, 
will give the principal address. Dr. 
Graham will speak on "The Man of 
Thought, Democratic Society, and the 
Scientific Revolutions." 

Other speakers will be Harlow 
Shapely, emeritus professor of ast- 
ronomy at Harvard and past presi- 
dent of the Academy of Arts and 
Sciences; Theodore Koop, director 
of Washington news and public af- 
fairs, CBS; and Harold Taylor, pre- 
sident of Sarah Lawrence College, 
Francis Horn, newly elected presi- 
dent of the University of Rhode Is- 
land and former executive secretary 
of the Association for Higher Edu- 
cation,will serve as general chair- 
man . 



The seminar's aim, according to 
Maxwell H # Goldberg, executive di- 
rector of the Humanities Center, is 
"to consider how scientists, human- 
ists and technologists, together 
with leaders of labor, industry and 
government, can help Americans to 
meet the challenge of the years a- 
head." 



SPECIAL LECTURE 

"The Scientist, the Humanist, and the 
Current Educational Crisis" will be 
the subject of Dr. George Boas 1 lec- 
ture at a summer school convocation 
in the Commonwealth Room, Student 
Union, Wednesday, J u ly 16 at 10:30 a.m. 
Dr. Boas is summarizing speaker at 
the Humanities Seminar. 




THE SUMMER COLLEGIA!: PAGE 2 



THE SUMMER 

OF 

UNIVERSITY OF 



COLLEGIAN 

THE 
MA3SACHUSETTS 



Adviser Doris E. Abrarcson 

Typist Nancy Parker 

Layout * Janet Kalinowski 

Reporters Peter St. Lnwrenc* 

Paul Leathe 






Summer Counseling 
Program Gets Underway 

The University of Massachusetts 
heralds another "first 11 as all en- 
tering members of the soon-to-be 
class of 1962 come to campus this 
summer for guidance and placement 
test3« 

Groups of approximately 200 each 
will spend three-day sessions being 
tested in English, languages, math 
and scholastic aptitude* Sessions 
began the weekend of June 26, will 
continue all through July and into 
the first two weekends of August* 

The standardized tests were for- 
merly given during Freshman Orien- 
tation Week in the fall, but it was 
felt by University officials that 
advance testing would enable the 
student to familiarize himself with 
the campus, academic life, and some 
of the faculty members before the 
crush of fall activities begins* 

Overnight compilation of test 
results by the Guidance Department, 
under the direction of William 
Field, enables the faculty adviser 
and pre-freshman to choose a course 
of study in line with the student's 
capabilities and interests* 

Outstanding results on the Eng- 
lish test qualifies the student for 
an advanced te3t in English compo- 
sition* If an exceptional level is 
reached in the latter, the student 
is allowed to omit English 1 and 2 
from his curriculum and to elect 
any other course on his academic 
level* 

SEE GUIDANCE PAGE 3 



June 
coldest 
the drie 
records 
chusetts 
was the 
driest 
station 



,f What Is So Rare?" 

1958 goes on record as the 
since 1916 (i|2 years) and 
st since 1914-9* According to 
at the University of Massa- 
• weather station, this June 
third coldest and the eighth 
in the 70 years 3ince the 
was i itablished* 



Mather Comments 
On Building Program 

Governor Furcolo's recent pro- 
posal to speed up the state educa- 
tional building program should mean 
7000 students at the University of 
Massachusetts by September of I960* 
A considerable increase in faculty, 
books, laboratory equipment, and 
educational supplies would be needed 
to teach an additional 2000 stu- 
dents* 

The Governor 1 s program calls for 
53^*731*000 for capital outlay at 
the University over a three-year 
period: $12*186,000 in 19£9;^10,£l2, 
000 in I960; and $12,033*000 in 
1961. 

The Governor's office states: 
"Governor Furcolo's educational pro- 
gram will greatly benefit the swift 
expansion of the University of Mass- 
achusetts. • *" 

President Mather in endorsing 
the speed-up, cautioned "that cur- 
rent and continued increases in fa- 
culty salaries will be needed to 
keep and recruit qualified staff to 
support such a capital outlay pro- 
gram. Support staff on the clerical 
and non-professional level, as well 
as books and teachers are also es- 
sential," he said. 



Student Observers Invited 

Student observers who wish to sit 
in on the round-table discussions 
scheduled for the American Humani- 
ties Seminar (July H4.-I6) may do so 
by applying at the Seminar's regis- 
tration desk in the Student Union* 

The one event which will be open 
to the public on a large scale is 
Frank Porter Graham's address: "The 
Man of Thought, Democratic Society* 
and the Scientific Revolutions," 
scheduled for Monday, July U4., at 
l:i|, c ; p. m* in the Student Union Ball 
Room. Mr. Graham La United Nations 
... preventative in Endia and Pukis- 
' an. 






Final Exam Schedule 
First 5-Week Term 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 3 



Examinations are scheduled according to meeting P^iod except in the case 
of certain laboratory courses which meet only in the afternoon. Place or 
examination will be the normally assigned classroom* 



Friday, July 25 



2:00 - 3:50 p.m. — classes which meet in period 2 



kjOO - 5:50 p.m. — 



Botany 1, Chemistry 1, 
Statistics 77-177 



Saturday, July 26 

8:00 - 9:50 a.m. 



classes which meet in period 3 



10:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. - 



- classes which meet in 
period 1 



Concerts Will Be Weekly Event 

A group of pre-college musicians 
are enjoying the facilities of the 
University of Massachusetts for six 
weeks of training in musi clanship. 
Under the direction of Prof. J. 
Clement 3chuler,the group presented 
the first of a series of weekly con- 
certs Sunday July 13. These concerts 
will continue through August 2. 

For performances the students 
have been divided into a 70-voice 
mixed chorus and a 52-piece band. 
Most of the croup is of high school 
age, but there are a few younger. 

Although most of the young mu- 
sicians live within a 100 mile ra- 
dius of the campus, more than a few 
hail from New York, riew Jersey, 
Maryland, the midwest, and the other 
New England states. 

The new music school is dedicated 
to two aims: the improvement of the 
musicianship of young people and 
the development of a teaching fa- 
culty. The faculty is drawn from 
the ranks of professionals who are 
able to give expert instruction in 
their special fields. 



David R. Clark, ass 
feasor in the English 
has recently had poems 
printed in an Iri3h 
The two poems and an es 
"Deirdre" appeared in 
Magazine for January— 



istant pro- 
Department, 

and an essay 

publication. 

say on Yeats ■ 
The Dublin 

March, 195 8 • 



Enrollment Figures Double 

Student enrollment in all of the 
University of Massachusetts slimmer 
terms and short courses i3 expected 
to reach 1800 - or nearly double 
last year f s figure. 

Last summer 1 s total figure in the 
full six-week academic term and 
short courses was 975, while regis- 
tration figures at the mid-way 
point this summer total 1600. Reg- 
istration for the first five-week 
term, which opened June 23, was 
nearly 800. About 375 have pre-reg- 
istered for the second five-week 
term opening July 2ft. 

Students may register July 28 
for courses in agricultural engin- 
eering, chemistry, economics, edu- 
cation, English, food technology, 
French, German, government, hi story, 
mathematics, philosophy, psychology, 
sociology, Spanish and speech. 

GUIDANCE Continued 

Informal mee tings are scheduled 
between faculty members and stu- 
dents. These meetings 3hould help 
in breaking down barriers existing 
between student and faculty so- 
cially. 

Parents of the students have been 
invited to attend meetings at the 
windup of each three-day session to 
discuss the test results with the 
faculty. They also get in on infor- 
mal discussions with faculty mem- 
bers, stand in lines at the Commons 
and get to know the campus which 
will soon be very f anfiliar to their 
children. 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE k 



Current Events 



THURSDAY JULY 17 



7:00 PM 



8:15 pm 



Music Room, Student Union 
Discussion of Brahms by 
Professor Doric Alviani. 

Movie "Desert Pox" Stu- 
dent Union 






FRIDAY JULY 18 



5:30 PM 






Boston Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood# Pierre 
Monteaux, conductor •Brahms 
concert . (includes the 
"Requiem") NOTE: Please 
sign up at the desk in 
the Union lobby by Tues- 
day July lf>. Busses will 
leave from the Union at 
5:30 PM. 



SUNDAY JULY 20 



2:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Music Cen- 
ter band concert. Student 
Union terrace or ballroom 
depending on weather con- 
ditions* 



JULY 20 THROUGH JULY 25 






Second Annual Cosmetology 
Institute, an advanced hair 
styling course for hair- 
dressers, and operators ac- 
tively practicing cosmeto- 
logy in licensed beauty 
shops • 



WEDNESDAY 
AUGUST 6 



JULY 23 to WEDNESDAY 

We will have as visitors 
to our campus a group of 
seven Italian "experimen- 
ters", sponsored by the 
Experiment in Interna- 
tional Living* The stu- 
dents will be housed at 
Crabtree and Van Meter 
dorms. 



Asian Day Scheduled 

As part of the current cultural 
exchange between Japan and the U- 
nited States, Asian Day will be held 
at the Student Union Wednesday, July 
23. 

It will be a one-day conference 
in the form of a symposium. Speech- 
making, discussions, question-and- 
answer periods will be the order of 
the day as professors get together* 
There will be representatives from 
the University of Massachusetts, Ho- 
kkaido University, and other colleges 
in the area, including teachers col- 
leges. 

Mr. Douglas W. Overton, for many 
years Executive Director of the Ja- 
pan Society, will be the symposium's 
principal speaker. 



REHABILITATION COUNSELORS MEET 

The University of Massachusetts 
is host to a group of vocational re« 
habilitation counselors from the 
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commis- 
sion. The 17 men arrived on campus 
July 7 and will stay thro ugh July 19. 

They represent the Massachusetts 
Rehabilitation Commission from all 
sections and district offices 
throughout the state. They are un- 
der going an in-service training 
program under the direction of Com- 
missioner Francis A. Harding* 

The training program is being 
conducted by staff members of the 
Commission and faculty members of 
Springfield College. The program is 
coordinated by Charles E. Campbell 
of South Easton, Mass. 



SWIMMING 

Cool off each weekday after- 
noon. Take a refreshing dip in our 
pool which is located in Hicks Gym- 
nasium. Pool hours are from 3:00 - 
lj.:00 PM for men students and from 
l±:00 to 5:00 PM for women. Women's 
suits will be provided. 









^Tickets for the concert will be 
given to you by Mr. Ricci who will 
be at the general admission ticket 
office (East parking lot) on the 
night of the concert. 



NOTICE: Chief Alec Blasko warns car 
owners that U. of M, parking regula- 
tions will be strictly enforced. 
Park where you're supposed to park 
and avoid getting tagged. 






I 




lj mmer 









I 




rvi 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



JULY 21,1958 



Number 5 



Wednesday Is Asian Day 



Asian Day is Wednesday, July 23. This symposium of Japanese and American 
professors will be held in Student Union, and there will be a Summer School 
Convocation at lllOO a.m., open to sunnier session faculty and students© 

Douglas W. Overton, for many years Executive Director of the Japan Society 
will be principal speaker of the symposium. For over half a century the Japan 
Society has had as its mission the fostering of a climate in which the rela- 
tions of our two countries will flourish. The title of his speech is ^'Japan- 
ese-American Relations In The Present Day." 

Attending the Asian Day confer- 
ence will be visiting professors 
from Hokkaido University, Japan, 
from colleges in the New England- 
area, as well as UofM professors* 



Mr. Overton's speech about Ameri- 
can contacts with Japan will be fol- 
lowed by a discussion hour. The pro- 
fessors are expected to discuss the 
identical and different interests 
the two countries possess in order 
to promote further mutual understan- 
ding between the countries. 

The afternoon session, led by Mr. 
Overton and Provost Shannon McCune, 
will point out various materials 
available to American teachers and 
instructors in their work in the 
Japanese field. 

Later in the afternoon three doc- 
umentary films will be shown, depic- 
ting Japanese life. The adventure 
film "Conspiracy in Kyoto", "Japan- 
ese Family" and" Japan" are the three 
to be shown. The famous Japanese 
movie "Rasha-Mon" will be shown in 
the Student Union Thursday, July 24 
at 8:15 p.m. 



ASIAN DAY CONVOCATION 
Don't forget Asian Day this Wednes- 
day, July 23. Summer School Convo- 
cation will be this week at lltOO 
a.m. in the Student Union. (Note the 
change in time.) 



i 



JRE-RSGISTER NOW 
Students should pre-roglster this 
week for the second five-week term 
of summer school at the Registrar's 
Office. 




THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 



Education Is Our Business 

At a National Conference on High- 
er Education held in Chicago last 
March, the theme was "Strengthening 
Quality in the Satellite Age.* 1 John 
Gardner of the Carnegie Foundation 
was one of the speaker s. He said 
that n we must seek excellence in a 
concern for all"; it will not serve 
our purpose to "replace our neglect 
of the gifted by neglect of the gen- 
erality". We should encourage all 
kinds of individuals" to run on all 
kind3 of tracks." To accomplish 
this purpose all kinds of institu- 
tions should be encouraged to a- 
chieve excellence in their objec- 
tives s the large state school, the 
technological institute, and the 
liberal arts college. Each should 
strive for its own kind of excell- 
ence. 

Gardner concluded wittily: "An 
excellent plumber is Infinitely 
more admirable than an incompetent 
philosopher. The society which 
scorns excellence in plumbing be- 
cause plumbing is a humble activity 
and tolerates shoddiness in philo- 
sophy because it is an exalted ac- 
tivity will have neither good plumb- 
ing nor good philosophy. Neither 
its pipes nor its theories will 
hold water." 

Max Lerner, at the same confer- 
ence, spoke on "Education La America 
— The Heroic Encounter". He empha- 
sized that we lack an image of the 
kind of nation we want to be; that 
we should want most to turn out 
young people who are "value cre- 
ators". Here's part of what he said 
about the role of the teachers 
"••as we look back at our school and 
college careers, what is it we re- 
member? Not what we read in the 
text books and not even what they 
told us in the lectures. What we 
remember and what remains with us 
is probably some teacher, some per- 
sonality, the memory of one or two 
teachers. I think of a voice or a 
phrase used by a teacher, the way 
he looked, his stance toward life, 

the quality of his personality 

With all our talk about getting 
back to elementals, let's remember 
that the core of the teaching exper- 
ience is that kind of a teacher." 



THE SU1E-ER COLIiSGIAN 
OF TIE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Adviser ., .Doris E. Abramson 

Typist Nancy Parker 

Layout Janet Kalinowski 

Reporters Peter St. Lawrence 

Paul Leathe 

Teacher Training Program 

A new professional program in 
teacher training at the University 
was started during the first ses- 
sion of the University^ summer 
school and will continue through 
the second session and on until Nov- 
ember. Graduates from many colleges 
including Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Har- 
vard, Tufts, Amherst, Trinity and 
the University have been enrolled* 
Many more applicants were turned 
down due to lack of space. The new 
program, which is unique in this 
area, is geared to teacher certifi- 
cation in the shortest possible 
time, in high standard professional 
courses for graduates of liberal 

arts colleges. 

SEE TEACHER TRAINING PAGE 4 

Report On Educational Exchange 

The United States attracted more 
foreign students to its schools in 
1957-58 than ever before in its his- 
tory, the Institute of International 
Education reported in a survey re- 
leased today. This country continued 
to lead the free world in the educa- 
tion of foreign persons,with 43,391 
students and scholars coming to 
study in 1801 American schools from 
145 countries — some as remote as 
Basutoland and the Fiji Islands. 

Three significant characteristics 
of foreign students in the U.S. ara 
revealed in the Institute's Open 
D oors , an annual statistical report 
on educational exchange! (1) the 
typical foreign student in the U.S. 
is a Far Easterner majoring in en- 
gineering; (2) he* is most likely 
here on his own funds, not because 
of a scholarship; and (3) in one 
out of three cases, he is interested 
especially if he is an engineer, in 
employment after graduation with 
the overseas branch of a U.S. cor- 
poration. The statistical "he", it 
might be added, is also prone to be 
an actual "he", with men students 
still outnumbering women more than 
three to one. The only country to 
send more women than men was the 

Philippines. 

SE£ EXCHANGE PROGRAM PAGE 4 



Exam Schedule 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 3 






Friday. July jjff 

2*00 - 3i50 p.m. m period 2 classes 

4*00 - 5;50 p.m. -Botany l,Chem. 1, 

Statistics 77-177 

Saturday. Ju}y 36 

8*00 - 9*50 a.m.- period 3 classes 

10:30 a.m. - 12*20 p.m. - period 1 

classes 

DON'T FORGET TO fRE-REGISTER THIS 
WEEK AT THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE. 



Quotable Quotes 

From the text of an address by 
Harold Taylor, President of Sarah 
Lawrence College, given at the Amer- 
ican Humanities Seminar, Tuesday, 
July 15. 

"•.We have no separate intellec- 
tual class in this country and it 
is my hope that we never will. The 
ideal society is one in which the 
citizens think for themselves and 
do not want others to do their 
thinking for them. There are, of 
course, intellectuals in every so- 
ciety and there are intellectuals 
in America. But in America they do 
not form a class of political or so- 
cial leaders whose function it is 
to think for the rest. Many of our 
political leaders take pride in not 
being intellectuals and take pains 
to make it clear that they are reg- 
ular Americans without any intellec- 
tual connections. The intellectual 
in America is tested by his society 
in the same way as anyone else - by 
his ability to perform the tasks he 
undertakes. If he is a novelist, 
can he write books which are inter- 
esting, which have In them the ring 
of truth, which compel the attention 
of the reader to the image of human 
life which they proclaim? If he is 
a newspaper writer, can he get down 
the facts, can he perform his task 
of informing the reader? If he is 
a composer, can his music command 
the attention of musicians, can he 
write for opera, for full orchestra, 
for dancers? If he is an educator, 
has he anything to say which can 
persuade his listener or evoke a re- 
sponse toward the ideas he advo- 
cates? 



"..In that case, who is the 
American intellectual? He is to be 
found in many areas of American so- 
ciety. The writer, certainly, the 
novelist, the editor, the poet, the 
playwright, movie and television 
writer, the teacher, the government 
official, the scientist, but every 
rcientist and every teacher, for 
example, is not an intellectual. A 
person who teaches or who carries 
out research may perform his task 
without a serious interest in the 
ideas with which he operates. An 
intellectual, in other words, is a 
person who is interested in ideas 
and carries on a serious intellec- 
tual life of his own. If he has no 
private world of ideas, he is merely 
a practitioner or a technician in 
the field of ideas." 



NEA Representative Visits 

John H« Starie, National Educa- 
tion Association representative, 
will visit education classes at the 
University of Massachusetts Thurs- 
day, July 2A. 

Mr. starie has been Field Repre- 
sentative for the New England area 
for the NEA since 1950. 

He attended high school in Am- 
herst, New Hampshire, and was grad- 
uated from the University of New 
Hampshire where he majored in Eng- 
lish and history; he continued his 
education, after obtaining a resi- 
dent fellowship at Columbia Univer- 
sity in New York, where he earned 
the M.A. degree. 

An instructor in Social Studies 
at the Tilton (N.H.) Preparatory 
School from 1936 to 1943, he later 
served as headmaster at high schools 
in Madison and Belmont. Before he 
entered teaching, Mr. Starie was 
assistant New Hampshire state direc- 
tor for the WPA Federal Writers 1 
Project. 

The NEA representative will vis- 
it classes in Machmer E33 and E34. 
In Machmer E35 there will be a spe- 
cial exhibit of books related to 
the field of education. 

John L. Bove is in charge of the 
display of recent publications; 
summer school faculty and students 
are invited to view the exhibit in 
Machmer E35. 



TAB SUMNER COLLEGIAN PAGE 4 



Current Events 



WEDNESDAY 
AUGUST 6 



JULY 23 to WEDNESDAY 

We will have as visitors 
to our campus a group of 
seven Italian "experimen- 
ter s", sponsored by the 
Experiment in Interna- 
tional Living. The stu- 
dents will be housed at 
Crabtree and Van Meter 
dorms* 



WEDNESDAY JULY 23 

American Contacts with Ja- 
pan, Symposium of Japanese 
and American Univ 

American Contacts with Ja- 
pan, Symposium of Japanese 
and American University 
Professors, 

11 sOO AM Opening Session- Common- 
wealth Room, Student Union 
Speaker: Donald W, Overton 

2i30 PM Afternoon Session - Common- 
wealth Room, Student Union 
Materials for American 
teachers on Japan* 



4s00 PM 



Documentary Films - Common- 
wealth Room, Student Union 
M Conspiracy in Kyoto ", 
11 Japane se Family 11 , "Japan" • 



8il5 to 

Midnight Dance for Summer Students* 
Commonwealth Room, Student 
Union, The Don Pepper Trio 
will provide the music* 

THURSDAY JULY 24 






8:15 PM 



Movie "Ra8ha-Mon",A Japan- 
ese classic, at the Student 
Union, No admission charge 



SUNDAY JULY 27 



2:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Misic Center 
Concert, 

An afternoon of delightful 
listening to Recital, Solo- 
ists, Singers, and Instru- 
mentalists- on the Student 
Union Terrace or Ballroom 
depending on weather condi- 
tions. No admittance charge 



COMPLETE POOL HOURS 
The University pool is open every 
day at 1:00 p,m, 

1-2 p.m. Men 
2-3 p.m* Women 
3-4. p,m. Men 
4 - 5 p*m. Women 

Monday and Friday evenings there is 
Mixed Swimming from 7 - 9 p»nu 

All groups on campus —students* 
faculty, convent loners, etc, — are 
welcome. 



TEACHER TRAINING Continued 

This new plan gives prospective 
teachers a program at a time when 
they can schedule it, enables super- 
intendents to see prospective tea- 
chers in action for effective eval- 
uation, and presents a new source 
of teachers. Seventy-five applica- 
tions were received by Dean Albert 
W, Purvis of the School of Educa- 
tion, but only 18 students in the 
secondary and 25 in the elementary 
curriculum were accepted* 

Dean Purvis said that in the very 
near future the School of Education 
hopes to be able to present enough 
graduate courses during the summer 
to facilitate the Master 1 s Degree 
for deserving persons* He also 
stated that he was very happy with 
the caliber of students enrolled 
for this new program and hopes that 
their interest will attract many 
more students in the future* 



EXCHANGE PROGRAM Continued 

The already large number of Amer- 
ican students going abroad for study 
rose further in the period surveyed 
by the report. They numbered 12,845 
in 52 countries with a tendency to 
concentrate heavily in the West, 
Fifty-eight percent, a record num- 
ber, went to Europe, 20% studied in 
Latin America and 13% went to Cana- 
da, 

The Far East continued this yoar 
to be the area which sent the larg- 
est number of foreign students to 
the U.S. — 33% of the total. Latin 
America was again second, with 21%. 
The only country to top the large 
Far Eastern delegations was neigh- 
boring Canada, which continued to be 
the single country with the largest 
number of students here* 




lj rv^rY^ior 









I 




hvl 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



July 28, 1958 



Number 6 



An Experiment In International Living 



A group of young men and women from Italy are visiting our campus for two weeks, 
under the auspices of The Experiment in International Living, a private, nonprofit 
educational Institution* 

The Experiment aims to build up In all countries groups of people who are inter- 
ested in working for better international understanding. The approach is an infor- 
mal one, recognizing the home as a basic educational institution and arranging for 
people to live in homes in other countries * 



The twelve Italian students, six 
men and six women, are all from Mi- 
Ion or nearby towns. They arrived 
Wednesday July 23, and will stay in 
Amherst for two weeks • 

While they are here they will ob- 
serve American education In action 
by attending lectures, auditing 
classes, taking part in the summer 
sossion recreation program. 

One event of special interest 
will be a trip to Tanglewood August 
1 with U of M students* They will 
have a chance to go there by bus 
and to hear an all-Wagner concert* 

Wednesday evening at 8:30 p.m* 
there will be an Informal gathering 
in Student Union, where coffee and 
Italian pastry will be nerved. Stu- 
dents, faculty and interested towns- 
people are cordially invited to at- 
tend, to take this opportunity to 
meet our guests* 



Dr» Ben Ricci, who Is in charge 
of arrangements for the group while 
on our campus, said, "It is our hope 
that the visitors willbe integrated 
into campus life as much as possible 
during their two-week stay with us* 
We hope especially that there will 
be an exchange of ideas and opinions 



between 
dents." 

The 
Living 
to get 



American and Italian stu- 



Experiment In International 
gives us a good opportunity 
to know our friends from 

other lands and gives them an equal 

opportunity to know us* 



NEXT CONVOCATION 
The next Summer School Convocation 
will be August 6 at 10:30 a.m. The 
speaker wiil ho an authority on the 
Middle Eant, Vm Laurens Hickok See- 
3 ye. 



THE SUI-L-ER COLLEGIAN 
OF THB 
UN IVERS ITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN Fa^ 2 



Current Events 



Adviser Doris E # Abramson 

Typist Nancy Parker 

Reporters Peter St. Lawrence 

Paul Leathe 

Notes 

REGISTRATION 

Registration for the second five- 
week term of the summer session 
will take place Monday July 28 in 
the Student Union Ballroom between 
1 and 5 P^m* 

SECOND SESSION 
(July 28 - August 30) 

Registration closes 5:00 PM Wednes- 
day, J u ly 30 • 

No course can be added after that 
date* 

No course can be dropped except WP 
(withdrew passing) after 5:00 P*M* 
Friday, August 1* 

Latest date for dropping a course 
WP is August 13 at 5:00 P.M. 

FRESHMEN STUDENTS 

Thirteen members of the Class of 
1962 have taken advantage of the 
new University policy to allow in- 
coming freshmen to start their col- 
lege career during summer session* 
A survey was taken by the Collegian 
to find out from the freshmen why 
they have started their college ca- 
reers early and how their courses 
compared to those they had in high 
school* Most of the students find 
the courses a bit harder but are ad- 
justing to the change readily . The 
main reasons given for their early 
start: to accelerate their education 
in anticipation of future work at a 
graduate level and, in some cases, 
to receive a degree prior to being 
called for military duty* 

According to Mr« Salwack, Assis- 
tant Provost, there will be infor- 
mal meetings with the new freshmen 
periodically to determine how they 
are adjusting to college life* The 
information gathered from these 
meetings will be of considerable 
value in determining the future va- 
lue of this program* 



WEDNESDAY JULY 30 



8:30 PM 



The Special Experimenters 
program* A night to get 
acquainted with the Ital- 
ian students and to enjoy 
some fine Italian pastry, 
Ballroom of Student Union 



THURSDAY JULY 31 



7:00 PM 



Music Room, Student Union 
Discussion of Wagner by 
Professor Joseph Contino 

8 j 15 PM Movie "Quo Vadis" Student 

Union 

FRIDAY AUGUST 1 



5:30 PM 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 
at Tanglewood # # 
Charles Munch and Pierre 
Monteux conductors* 
Wagner concert* NOTE: 
Please sign up at the 
desk in the Union lobby 
by Tuesday July 29*Busses 
will leave from the Union 

at 5:30 PM. 



SUNDAY AUGUST 3 



?.:30 PM 



Amherst Summer Music Cen- 
ter concert: orchestra 
and band. Student Union 
terrace or ballroom de- 
pending on weather con- 
ditions* 



THURSDAY AUGUST 7 



8:15 PM 



Movie 
Student Union 



The following events may also be of 
interest to you: 

Every Friday evening during August* 
Amherst Community Band Concerts on 
the Town Common, 8:00 to 9:30 p*m* 



# Tickets for the concert will be 
given to you by Mr* Ricci who will 
be at the general admission ticket 
office (East parking lot) on the 
night of the concert* 







i^i mmrv^or 





University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 






VOLUME I 



AUGUST 4, 1958 



NUMBER 7 



Middle East Authority To Speak Wednesday 



Dr. Laurons Hickok See lye, noted 
teacher and theologian, will bo con- 
vocation speaker on Wednesday, Aug. 
6, in the Commonwealth Room of Stu- 
dent Union at 10:30 a.m. 

The title of his speech is "Ma- 
rines, Meet The Middle East** Dr. 
Seelye is an authority onthe Middle 
East, where he has lived and taught 
for many years. 

Born in Iowa, he received his 
B.A. at Amherst College in 1911. He 
has a diploma from Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary; M.A. from Columbia; 
LL.D. from Amherst, Western Reserve 
University and Queens University in 
Ontario, C a nada # 

Dr. Seelye served as minister of 
the Stanley Congregational Church 
in Chatham, N.J. from 1915-18 and 
was chaplain in the U.S.A r my during 
World War I. 

During part of the First World 
War,D r . Seelye served the American- 
Syrian Relief Committee in the USA. 

Especially interesting is that 
he taught philosophy and psychology 
at the American University of Bei- 
rut, Lebanon, from 1919 to 1933# 

From 1935 to 19/4-0, Dr. Seelye 
was president of St« Lawrence Uni- 
versity in Canton, N.Y. 



Laber, after teaching at Smith 
and Bennington he taught at Robert 
College and The American College 
for Girls, Istanbul, Turkey during 
the 'forties and early 'fifties. He 
was chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Y.M.C.A. in Istanbul 

from 1950 to 1957. 

While at the American University 
of Beirut, he served as the faculty 
director of student extra-curricu- 
lar activities and helped found an 
International Cooperative Club for 
student residence • 

The August 6 convocation will be 
open to interested townspeople as 
well as to students and faculty. It 
will provide a chance to learn 
firsthand about countries and people 
currently in the news. 



SAVE AUGUST 12, 3:00 PM 
The Literary Society will present 
readings by five poets: G. Stanley 
Koehler, Sylvia Plath Hughes, Ted 
Hughes, David Ridgely Clark and Leon 
0. Barron. They will read in the 
Governor's Lounge, Student Union. 
(See next week's COLLEGIAN for de- 
tails.) 







THE SI ER 

OF 
UNIVJSl'iiSrW or 1 



n\ 



COL3 ! 

THE 

MAS3ACHUSE' 



Adviser Doris E. Abramson 

Typist Nancy Parker 

Leeds Needs Help 

"I just like to help people #* 
The3e were the words of one of the 
workers on the Leeds Veterans Hospi- 
tal project. Under this program, 
sponsored by the Campus Religious 
Council, student volunteers work 
with patients at the Leeds Veterans 
Administration Hospital. After the 
required two orientation sessions, 
the volunteer workers go on the 
wards. There they entertain the pa- 
tients by playing cards, checkers 
and other games, or simply by just 
talking. The workers try to estab- 
lish contact with the patients giv- 
ing them the personal attention that 
the busy staff does not have the 
time to give. The program provides 
a break for the patients in an 
otherwise dull routine, as well as 
providing contacts with people from 
the "outside. 11 

Last year, the program suffered 
from a lack of male volunteers. 
While other area colleges sent male 
volunteers on the project, UMass. 
sent none. There will be an oppor- 
tunity early this fall to attend 
the required orientation sessions. 
Groups willprobably go to Leeds one 
evening every other week. The pro- 
gram will not take a great amount 
of time. The work is rewarding, both 
to the patients of the hospital and 
to the workers taking part. 

While this is the summer session, 
students might keep the program in 
mind for the fall semester. Will 
you be at the orientation sessions 
next fall? What about it, UMass men? 

Marshall H. Whithed '61 



CONVOCATION 
Tills week's convocation should be 
of special interest to everyone on 
campus. Dr. Laurens Hickok See lye, 
noted authority on the Middle East, 
will speak Wednesday August 6 at 
10:30 a.m. in the Commonwealth Room 
Student Union. The title of his 
speech: "Marines, Meet The Middle 
East." 



Summer Festival 
At Amherst Art Center 

The Amherst Art Center will hold 
its second annual Summer Festival 
at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 8, on the 
north lawn of the J Q nos library, 
weather permitting, in case of in- 
clement weather, the festival will 
be in the library's auditorium. 

Members of the Art Center and 
guest artists will present demon- 
strations at 2 p.m. Mr* and Mrs. 
James McKinnel of Old Deerfield 
will show the process of pottery 
making. Robert Darr Wert, owner of 
the Country P r ints in Gill, will 
demonstrate the art of silk screen 
printing. Water color painting will 
be illustrated by Stephen Hamilton 
(many of his paintings are in Stu- 
dent Union) and oil painting by 
John Gnatek. There will be other 
demonstrations by members of the 
A r t Center. 

The public is cordially invited 
to attend, with no admission charge. 
Guests are also encouraged to view 
the exhibition of paintings, pot- 
tery and weaving by Amherst Center 
members. The exhibition will be on 
display upstairs in the library 
during the entire month of August. 

KB ART CENTER PAGE i| 






Book By Dr. Sweetman Published 

Dr. Harvey L. Sweetman, Prof easor 
of Entomology, has just published a 
new book, "The Principles of Biolo- 
gical Control." He has a B.S. from 
Colorado State College, M.S. from 
Iowa State College, and Ph.D. from 
the University of Massachusetts. He 
has been on our faculty since 1930. 

The publishers, V/m. C. Brown Co. 
of Iowa, announced that thi3 book 
a upersedes an earlier book, "Biolo- 
gical Control of Insects", by tho 
same author. The new book, an ex- 
tension and revision of the earlier 
one, is written up to tho frontier 
of present knowledge In the field 
of biological control. It treats 
the subject on a world-wide basis. 
It is the only overall book dealing 
exclusively with the biological con- 
trol of pests that meets the needs 
of students and research workers 
alike. 

SEE SWEETMAN PAGE k 









f 






Notes And Quotes 



DANGEROUS PROFESSION 
"Teaching is the most dangerous 
profession. It deals with our chil- 
dren, the most precious of our nat- 
ural resources* It refines them 
into brave and wonderful adults or 
it grossly degrades them into dull, 
over-afnd adolescents. Its results 
color, mold, and determine the shape 
of our nation and the character of 
our people . 

"The good teacher must be a per- 
son with a profound love of a sub- 
ject, born of the fulness of fam- 
iliarity* He must have an excel- 
lent operational tinders tanding of 
basic educational principles, not 
the mere word-shadows of profession- 
al jargon. The teacher must have a 
love of people in general, und of 
children in particular, must have 
the ability to awaken and to main- 
tain the interest of students and 
to direct those interests toward 
successful experiences. Above all. 
the teacher must be able to foster 
wonder. If 

Prank G. Jennings 
The S aturday Rev i c w 
Ma i- eh i 8. 1958 

WORK CONFERENCE 

Thirty-two graduate nurse prac- 
titioners from 21 agencies (depart- 
ments of education and health as 
well as visiting nurse association) 
and five senior nursing students 
from two Massachusetts schools of 
nursing completed a ten-day work 
conference on July3. The title of 
the conference was "Implications of 
Child Growth and Behavior to Nurs- 
ing Service". 

Dr. Isabel Valadian, professor 
of Child Growth and Behavior, and 
Mrs. Ruth Cumings, associate profes- 
sor of Public Health Nursing at Har- 
vard School of Public Health, assumed 
the primary responsibility for the 
contents of the conference. They 
also served as consultants, giving 
advice to groups concerning improved 
service to families. 



NOTE: Check Student Union announce- 
ments in Lobby. 



Some Historic Spots 
In Pioneer Volley 



Here are just a few of the 
houses and museums in thi 
the state, listed by the 
Valley association for th 
of tourists and others i 
in visiting them: 

AMHERST 
Strong House, 67 Amity 
in 17hkf contains exhibi 
Amherst Historical Socie 
daily 2-3> p.m. Nominal 
charge. 

DEERFIELD 



historic 

s part of 

Pioneer 

e benefit 

nterested 



St., built 
ts of the 
ty. Open 
admission 



Indian House, Old Deerfield St., 
museum and craft sales room, weav- 
ing. The Indian House Memorial is 
a replica of the historic Indian 
House of Colonial times (1697-181*8) 
and a center for weaving with looms 
in operation. Also Bloody Brook 
Tavern, where a pottery is estab- 
lished. Both buildings architec- 
turally interesting, contain good 
antiques and examples of colonial 
furnishings. Closed Tuesdays. Open 
weekdays 9:30 to noon, 1 to 5 P#m. 
Sunday, 1 to 5. Season May 1 to Nov. 
1. Nominal admission charge. 

Frary House, Old Deerfield St., 
an historic inn, built in I683. 
During American Revolution was a 
Whig Tavern and frequent "stop 11 for 
Benedict Arnold during his loyal 
assignments for the Continental Army. 
Authentic antiques, interesting 
ballroom. Open May 1 to Nov. 1, Tues- 
day through Saturday, 9 to noon, 
1:30 to 5 P.m.; Sundays 2 to 5 P.m. 
Nominal admission charge. 

HADLEY 

The Farm Museum, Route 9, Hadley 
Center, 1783 barn housing rare col- 
lections of early farm implements 
and early vehicles. Emily Dickin- 
son's family coach with silver 
handles on the door. Open May 1 to 
Nov. 1, Saturday and Sunday, from 2 
to 5 P.m. No charge. 

Porter-Phelps-HuntInp;ton House, 
built 1752. This historic house re- 
cently pictured in Life Magazine 
has 3een no structural change since 
1799. The homestead is replete with 
original family antique furniahinn3, 
colonial museum pieces, and historic 
documents are on display. Open daily 
from early May to Oct. 12. Small 
admission charge. 









THE SUMTER COLLEGIAN PAGE h 



Current Events 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 



8:00 
to 

9:1+5 PM 



Variety Show, Amherst Sum- 
mer Music C enter • A final 
tune-up before the group 
leaves for an overseas 
tour. Student U n ion ball- 
room. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 7 



0:15 PM 



Movie 
Student Union 



MONDAY AUGUST 11 



6:30 PM 



Valley Players* at Mt. 
Park Casino, in Holyoke 
"Bus Stop" Busses will 
leave from the Union at 
6:30 PM, play begins at 
8:30 PM. NOTE: Please 
sign up at the desk in 
the Union lobby by Friday 
August 8. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 11+ 



8:15 PM 



Movie "She^ Working Her 
Way Through College" 
Student Union 



SPECIAL: Community band concerts on 

every Friday in August - 
8:00 - 9:30 PM. 



-"-Tickets for the play will be given 
to you by Mr. Ricci who will be at 
the ticket office at lit. Park on the 
night the trip is nude. 



SWKETMAN Continued 

In an aavance announcement, the 
publishers stated, "Theoretical as 
well as practical information is 
analyzed and presented in a consis- 
tent and logical fashion." 

"The Principles of Biological 
Control" is likely to become a pop- 
ular textbook and a useful refer- 
ence work for persons doing research 
in the field of entomology. 



ARK YOU AVERAGE? 

If you drovo 8000 miles in 1957# 
you're about average, according to 
the National Safety Council. 

The council, in its recently pub- 
lished statistical yearbook, "Acci- 
dent Facts", reported that the na- 
tion's 80 million licensed motorists 
drove a total of 650 billion miles- 
an average of little more than 8000 
miles per person. 

Auto accidents, said the council, 
injured 1,1+00,000 drivers and pedes- 
trians in 1957, and took the lives 
of 38,500 persons. 






NEW PROGRAM ADVISER 
Michael Laine Is the new Program 

Adviser in the Student Union build- 
ing. He reported to the University 
July 21, according to Student Union 
Director, William D. Scott. 

Mr. Laine is a 1958 graduate of 
the University of New Mexico, where 
he majored in psychology. At the 
U. of New Mexico he was chairman of 
the Union Board, chairman of the 
Union Program Directorate, and pres- 
ident of Tau Kappa Epsilon. 

The posltionto which he has been 
appointed at our Union Is the one 
formerly held by Marilyn Gross. 



M*T CENTER Continued 

At j> p. if. there will be a con- 
cert, sponsored by the A r t Center. 
Featured will be Francis Carver, 
flute, a teacher of flute at Skid- 
more College; Joanne Dickinson, 
flute, University of Rochester grad- 
uate; Emil Hebert, who has played 
bassoon with many of the leading 
symphony orchestras here and abroad; 
and Maria Gregoire, concert pianist 
of Heath. The program will include 
selections by Telemann, Haydn, Mo- 
zart, and Brahms. 

Refreshments will be served fol- 
lowing the concert. 



LIBRARY HOURS 
Hugh Montgomery, University Li- 
brarian, has announced the following 
summer hours for the period August 
k to August 30: Monday through Fri- 
day, 8:30 a.m. - 5*30 P.m. Closed 
Saturday and Sunday all day, with 
the exception of Saturday August 30 
when the library will be open from 
8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 




i_j mnner 









I 




I^J 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



AUGUST 11,1958 



NUMBER 8 






5 Poets To Read Their Works 

"An Arternoon of Poetry" will be 
presented Tuesday at 3 by the Uni- 
versity Literary Society in the Gov- 
ernor's Lounge of the Student Union* 

Reading from latest works will 
be G. Stanley Koehler, Sylvia Plath 
Hughes, Ted Hughes, David Ridgely 
Clark and Leon 0* Barron. 

U. stan±ey ivoehler has published 
poems in the "Sewanee Review" # "Yale 
Review", "Poetry", and in "New Poems 
by American Poets." He is a member 
of the University English Depart- 
ment. 

Ted Hughes 1 book, "Hawk in the 
Rain", won the First Publication 
Award of the Poetry Center of the 
YMHA and YWHA of New York in cooper- 
ation with Harper & Brothers, in 
1957* Judges of the contest were 
W.H. Auden, Marianne M Q ore and Ste- 
phen Spender. Mr. Hughes, who last 
year taught creative writing at the 
U. of M., has published poems in 
"Accent", the "Atlantic", "Nation" 
and "London Magazine •" 

David Ridgely Clark of the Uni- 
versity's English Department re- 
ceived the Eugene F.Saxton Harper's 
Memorial Fellowship in 1957 • He has 
published poems in the "Kenyon Re- 
view", "Poetry", the "Dublin Maga- 



zine" and "Voices." He has just, 
returned from Ireland, where he was 
working on a study of the plays of 
William Butler Yeats. 

Leon 0. Barron has published 
poems, "Northampton Poets" and else- 
where. Currently he is teaching the 
modern poetry course in the second 
term of the summer session. 

Coffee will be served at the con- 
clusion of the poets' readings . The 
public is welcome to attend. 



Probst Speaks At August 13 Convocation 

George E. Probst, executive di- 
rector of the Thomas Alva Edison 
Foundation, educator and broadcaster, 
will be speaker for the Aug. 13 con- 
vocation at 10:20 in the Student 
Union. 

He will speak on "The current ed- 
ucational crisis in the perspective 
of time". 

Mo3t recently, Mr. Probst has 
been working on a course of lectures 
and discussions dealing with de 
Tocqueville's "Democracy in America" 
designed as a radio course for 
adults. He has been supported by 
the Fund for Adult Education to New 
York University. The course will be 
offered on an experimental basis 
rfer NYU auspices. 



* *-^ 









THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION 

EDITOR .JOEL WOLFSON 

TYPIST .NANCY PARKER 

Current Events 



WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 

8:30 PM Dance. Commonwealth Room 

to Student Union 
Midnight Don Tepper trio. 

THURSDAY AUGUST 21 

8:15 PM Movie "Golden Boy" 

Student Union 

THURSDAY AUGUST 28 

8:15 PM Movie "So Big' 1 

Student Union 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 



Faculty Notes 

Rud E. Meyerstein, instructor of 
French, presented a paper on "The 
determination of linguistic func- 
tion" during a recent conference of 
the Linguistic Society of America 
meeting at the University of Michi- 
gan, Ann Arbor • 

Dr. Warren Litsky, professor of 
bacteriology, has been awarded a 
grant from the US Public Health Ser- 
vice to conduct research in allergy 
and infectious diseases. Specifical- 
ly, Dr. Litsky will be concerned 
with "Thermal death time character- 
istics of milk organisms." 

Two members of the food technol- 
ogy department, P. John Francis, 
assistant professor, and Bans! L. 
Amla, instructor will attend the 
annual convention of the American 
Institute of Biological Sciences 
Aug. 2I4.-28 at Indiana University. 
More than 3000 persons, representing 
35 affiliated societies will attend. 









University Of Massachusetts Student At Brussels World Fair 




Three collegians from the United 
States pose in the U.S. Pavilion at 
the Brussels World's Fair where 
they are guides. Their distinctive 
uniforms made of Acrilon and donated 
by the Chemstrand Corporation per- 
mits visitors to single them out in 
crowds to answer questions and per- 
form escort duty. 

Betty Lou Anderson (left) of De- 
troit is a junior at the University 



of Michigan, Beverly E. Franks (cen« 
ter) of Boston attended the Univer- 
sities of New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts, and Robert Mat suda( right) 
of Honolulu is a junior at the Uni- 
versity of Hawaii. They are members 
of the guide corps which includes 
more than 250 youths from the United 
States and its territories. 











Kji rv^imoor 









I 




rvi 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



AUGUST 11,1958 



NUMBER 8 



5 Poets To Read Their Works 

"An Afternoon of Poetry" will be 
presented Tuesday at 3 by the Uni- 
versity Literary Society in the Gov- 
ernors Lounge of the Student Union* 

Reading from latest works will 
be G. Stanley Koehler, Sylvia Plath 
Hughes, Ted Hughes, David Ridgely 
Clark and Leon 0. Barron. 

U. btanxey koehler has published 
poems in the "Sewanee Review" # "Yale 
Review", "Poetry", and in "New Poem3 
by American Poets." He is a member 
of the University English Depart- 
ment. 

Ted Hughes 1 book, "Hawk in the 
Rain", won the First Publication 
Award of the Poetry Center of the 
YMHA and YWIIA of New York in cooper- 
ation with Harper & Brothers, in 
1957 • Judges of the contest were 
W.H. Auden, Marianne M D ore and Ste- 
phen Spender. Mr. Hughes, who last 
year taught creative writing at the 
U. of M., has published poems in 
"Accent", the "Atlantic", "Nation" 
and "London Magazine." 

David Ridgely Clark of the Uni- 
versity^ English Department re- 
ceived the Eugene F.Saxton Harper's 
Memorial Fellowship in 1957 • He has 
published poems in the "Kenyon Re- 
view", "Poetry", the "Dublin Maga- 



zine" and "Voices." He has just 
returned from Ireland, where he was 
working on a study of the plays of 
William Butler Yeats. 

Leon 0. Barron has published 
poems, "Northampton Poets" and else- 
where* Currently he is teaching the 
modern poetry course in the second 
term of the summer session. 

Coffee will be served at the con- 
clusion of the poets' readings. The 
public is welcome to attend* 



Probst Speaks At August 13 Convocation 

George E. Probst, executive di- 
rector of the Thomas Alva Edison 
Foundation, educator and broadcaster, 
will be speaker for the Aug. 13 con- 
vocation at 10:20 in the Student 
Union. 

He will speak on "The current ed- 
ucational crisis in the perspective 
of time". 

Most recently, Mr. Probst has 
been working on a course of lectures 
and discussions dealing with de 
Tocqueville 1 s "Democracy in America" 
designed as a radio course for 
adults. He has been supported by 
the Fund for Adult Education to New 
York University. The course will be 
offered on an experimental basis 
"-^rier NYU auspices* 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION 

EDITOR. .JOEL WOLFSON 

TYPIST .NANCY PARKER 

Current Events 

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 



8:30 PM 
to 

Midnight 



Dance. Commonwealth Room 
Student Union 
Don Tepper trio. 



THURSDAY AUGUST 21 

8:15 PM Movie "Golden Boy" 

Student Union 

THURSDAY AUGUST 28 

8:15 PM Movie "So Big" 

Student Union 



THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN PAGE 2 



Faculty Notes 

Rud E. Meyerstoin, instructor of 
French, presented a paper on "The 
determination of linguistic func- 
tion" during a recent conference of 
the Linguistic Society of America 
meeting at the University of Michi- 
gan, Ann Arbor* 

Dr. Warren Litsky, professor of 
bacteriology, has been awarded a 
grant from the US Public Health Ser- 
vice to conduct research in allergy 
and infectious diseases* Specifical- 
ly, Dr. Litsky will be concerned 
with "Thermal death time character- 
istics of milk organisms." 

Two members of the food technol- 
ogy department, P. John Francis, 
assistant professor, and Bans! L. 
Amla, instructor will attend the 
annual convention of the American 
Institute of Biological Sciences 
Aug. 24-28 at Indiana University. 
More than 3000 persons, representing 
35 affiliated societies will attend. 



University Of Massachusetts Student At Brussels World Fair 







Three collegians from the United 
States pose in the U.S. Pavilion at 
the Brussels World 1 s Fair where 
they are guides. Their distinctive 
uniforms madecf Acrilon and donated 
by the Chemstrand Corporation per- 
mits visitors to single them out in 
crowds to answer questions and per- 
form escort duty* 

Betty Lou Anderson (left) of De- 
troit is a junior at the University 



of Michigan, Beverly E. Franks (cen« 
ter) of Boston attended the Univer- 
sities of New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts, and Robert Ma tsuda( right) 
of Honolulu is a junior at the Uni- 
versity of Hawaii. They are members 
of the guide corps which includes 
more than 25>0 youths from the United 
States and its territories. 










kji rv^ir^r^ or 









I 




1^1 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 



VOLUME I 



AUGUST 18, 1958 



NUMBER 9 



Music Center Called Huge Success As First Season Ends 



Upon completion of its first 
ful] summer of activity, Dr. J.Clem- 
ent Schuler, director of the Amherst 
Summer Music Center, was deeply 
grateful to all departments of the 



University of Massachusetts for 
their cooperation extended to the 
Center during its stay on campus. 

continued on page 6. 




The first year of instruction at the Amherst Summer 
Music Center has been a great success. Pictured above are 
members of the student orchestra* The goal of the school 
is 500 students. This year 76 sturlento were enrolled. 










THE SUMMER COLLEGIAN 
OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY OF 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL SESSION 

EDITOR ••#•«••••*»*•• *JOEL WOLFSON 

TYPIST .NANCY PARKER 

REPORTER . .BILL HOGARTH 



The Sumner Collegian 
Page 2 



President Emeritus Dies 




Dr. Ralph Albert Van Meter, 61+, 
President of the University of Mass- 
achusetts 191^8-^, died suddenly at 
his home in Harwich, Mass., on Sat- 
urday morning, July 26. 

Dr. Van Meter was born in Colum- 
bus Grove, Ohio, October, 1893. He 
received his BS from Ohio State Uni- 
versity in 1917, the M.S. from the 
U of Mass. in 1930, Ph.D. from Cor- 
nell in 1935 and the honorary LL,D # 
Amherst College, 19tj.9, and the U of 
Mass., 1951j.» 

He joined the staff of the U of 
Mass. in 1917 as extension special- 
ist in food conservation, was pro- 
fessor of pomology, I923-I4.8, Dean, 
School of Horticulture, 1931-l;8, 
Dean in charge of Army Training Pro- 
gram, 19l^2-l;5>> Acting President, 
19Ij.6-1j.7j President, 19lj.B-51|. and Pre- 
sident Emeritus, 1954-58* 

During his administration as pre- 
sident, the State College became the 
University of Massachusetts and the 
expansion program began to develop* 
Some 20 new buildings were planned 
which involved an expenditure of 
over 10 million dollars. In addi- 
tion his administration saw the con- 
solidation of the Schools of Agri- 
culture and Horticulture into a 
single unit, the establishment of a 
College of Arts and Sciences, and 
the inceptioxi of three new schools- 
business administration, engineer- 
ing, and nursing. 

Dr. Van Meter developed the pro- 
gram for veterans at the Fort Devens 
branch of the University which oper- 
ated from 19)4.6 to 19i+9» He also de- 
veloped the plans for the transfer 
of several thousand veteran students 
from Fort Devens to the University* 

For J4.I years Dr* Van Meter has 
been associated with the University* 




DR • RALPH A • VAN METER SERVED THE 
UNIVERSITY FROM 1917 UNTIL HIS UNTIMELY 
DEATH THIS PAST JULY 

In his earlier years of service he 
devoted his time to the scientific 
study of agriculture and its appli- 
cation of this research to the 
training of young men and women in 
agriculture and beyond the campus 
to farmers in the Commonwealth and 
throughout the United States. In 
the latter period of his service he 
was called upon for administrative 
duties, in particular during World 
War II and the University expansion 
in the post-war years • In words of 
the citation when the highest degree 
of the University, the LL.D., was 
conferred upon him in 1951J., he met 
these challenges "with fortitude 
and inspiring largeness of vision 1 .* 
His work showed "the generous pat- 
tern you have advocated for our 
emergence as a great university." 

Dr. Van Meter believed firmly in 
the ideals and aims of Mp-her edu- 
cation. He stood for the democratic 
principle that, in his words, "Op- 
portunities in higher education 
should not be fixed by color of the 
skin; nor by the place of residence* . 
nor by religion, nor by sex, nor by 
financial status of the parents, but 
by capacity for learning only... For 
each according to his need; to each 
according to his ability*" 

A large dormitory on the campus 
which was completed in 1957 was 
named in honor of Dr. Van Meter* 

In absence of President J. Paul 
Mather from campus, Provost Shannon 
McCune made the following statement: 

continued on page 6. 









^Jne Ljood ^J each 



er 



The Sunmv?r Collegian 
Page 3 






THE GOOD TEACHER 

By MARK VAN DOREN 

(Poet and professor of Columbia 
University in an address at the in- 
auguration of Pres. Richard Glenn 
Gettell of Mt. Holyoke College) 



lots of luck!! 



The words of a teacher bear so 
many responsibilities that if all 
of them were ever present in his 
mind together he would grow as si- 
lent as the grave • 

The teacher's responsibility to 
the student is so huge and heavy a 
thinp- that no tear.hAr \* ^ «* right-, 
mind considers It at all. No good 
teacher, I mean. For a good teacher 
has had the experience of learning 
that his words have an effect upon 
those who sit before him: An effect, 
it may be, that will endure for de- 
cades and, In certain cases, given 
enough age In the teacher, have in- 
deed endured that long. And it may 
gratify him to be told of this. 

But if he commenced each of his 
r.lasap* by wondering what future 
actions or thoughts were going to 
be the result of what he said, if 
he asked himself seriously what 
characters he was going to shape, If 
ever so oddly or so little, he might 
be terrified before he spoke one 
word. Normally he is blessed with 
a healthy indifference to such con- 
siderations t He is concerned with 
what he is going to say, and with 
whether or not it is true. 

I scarcely need to explain that 
the kind of teacher *» ;mve In view 
is the kind for whom the subject 
was created. It is his subject; he 
spends his life thinking about it, 
whether in or out of class; it is 
his second if not his first nature; 
it is what gives him joy.No student 
ever fails to be aware of this, 

A teacher can fool his colleagues; 
he may even fool his president; but 
he never fools his students. They 
know when he loves his subject and 
when he does not. 

They may think such love to be a 
queer thing, and they may resolve 
never to fall victim to it them- 
selves; but their respect for it 
will never cease. And respect for 
a subject, like respect for an idea, 
is the beginning of wisdom; or at 
the very least, respect for the 
love of a subject* 



Final examinations of the second 
Summer Session will be held Friday, 
August 29 and Saturday, August 30. 
Examinations will be held in the 
normally-assigned classrooms. 

The schedule is as follows: 

August 29, 2:00-3:50 

Classes which meet in period 3 
(11:20 to 12:^0) 

August 30, 9:00-9:50 

Classes which meet in period 1 

(5:00-9:50) 

August 30, 10 00-12: 20 

Classes which meet in period 2 
(9:lj.0-ll:10) 

Potash Named Foreign Student Coordinator 

Dr. Robert Potash, assistant pro- 
fessor cf history, has been appointed 
Foreign Student Coordinator, Provost 
Shannon McCune has announced. He 
returned to the University staff in 
September 1957 after serving two 
years as a Foreign Service Reserve 
Officer, Division of Research for 
American Republics, U.S. Department 
of State. He has also traveled and 
studied in Mexico and South America 
on other fellowship and scholarship 
grants. 

Faculty Notes 

Appointments Announced 

Appointments to the physics and 
chemistry departments of the Univ- 
ersity effective September 1 have 
been announced. 

William D. Foland, who holds an 
A. P., M.S. and Ph.D. from the Univ- 
ersity of Tennessee has been appoin- 
ted assistant professor in physics. 

Two new physics instructors, Phil- 
ip Johnson and Jesse 0. Richardson 
both studied at the U of M. Johnson, 
who earned his B.S. here, has had 
more than ten years experience in 
teaching physics and related courses. 
He was on the faculty at the Univer- 
sity in 19I4J4. and since 191+6 has been 
teaching physics at Wentworth Insti- 
tute. Boston. 

continued on page 6. 









The Summer Collegian 
Page 4 







THE OUTDOOR BARBECUE, PREHISTORIC STYLE, FEATURED AN OPEN FIRE. PRIMITIVE 
utensils inoluded a pointed stiok for cooking ar> ating meat. Licjuids were 
carried and served from hollcwed-out gourds or dried animal skins* 

picnics ate 9$ old $$ the hills 



Civilization and its refinements 
notwithstanding, there are some 
things which we still have in com- 
mon with our primitive ancestors • 
We might say that one of them is to- 
day's popular pastime of eating out 
of doors whenever the elements al- 
low. 

FAR PROM NEV7 

Although the cook-out trip and 
backyard barbecue have certainly in- 
creased in favor during the past de- 
cade, the idea is far from new* The 
"family picnic" actually traces its 
origins back to the stone age # In 
various parts of the world, arche- 
ologists have uncovered ancient n pic 
nic sites" — remnants of what had 
been a small campfire, eating uten- 
sils and even untidy picnic left- 
overs in the form of animal bones. 
And judging from the locations of 
these finrls. it is also obvious 



that primitive man liked to dine 
in the great outdoors as much as 
does his modern descendant. 

The pre-historic picnic probably 
began on the same premise as today's 
outdoor party. Inspired by a lovely 
sunny dav. it is easy to imagine 
the cave man and nis family picKing 
up a few weapons and tools and set- 
ting out for a fine outdoor meal # 
Of course, prehistoric man had a 
number of pressing problems that 
Twentieth Century man doesn't have 
to face. First of all, he had to 
seek and kill his own meat, rather 
than having the convenience of pre- 
cut juicy steaks available at a 
nearby supermarket. It was danger- 
ous business to stalk and then out- 
wit his prey, and he and his family 

continued on page 5. 









were in constant peril on whav 
might be a long trip on foot in 
searching for their picnic-fare. 
The next problem was in getting the 
cooking fire started, usually open 
and on the ground, and ignited by 
the crude flint method. 

Modern man, on the other hand, 
usually finds a convenient built-in 
charcoal grill at the picnic ground 
or could take along one of the new 
portable electric barbecue units of 
stainless steel — for which most 
parks supply the electrical outlets. 
CAVEMAN HAD ADVANTAGES 
Conversely, however, the cave man 
had some advantages. While he and 
his family had to travel on foot, 
thev didn»t have the problems of 
heavy automobile traffic or "Sunday 
drivers M l In his uncivilized world, 
he could choose most any convenient 
site for his party ~ there were no 
crowds, no "Keep Off the Grass" or 
"No Trespassing" signsi 



The Summer Collegian 
Pase 5 

Ana although we don't know for 
sure, it would be a safe guess that 
prehistoric man, his family and his 
friends, enjoyed these outdoor 
feasts as much as we do today, and 
that these gatherings resulted in 
the same warm, friendly atmosphere 
which we like about our own casual 
Sunday outings» 

Messina Awarded Grant 

The Graduate School of Bowling 
GreenState University has announced 
the awarding of an assistantship in 
Health & Physical Education to Mr. 
Vincent Messina for the academic 
year 1958-1959. This assistantship 
provides a cash stipend of $1200 
and the remission of the registra- 
tion fee and the out-of-state fee 
for the academic year and the ensu- 
ing summAT» school. 




DINING OUT OF DOORS 1958 HOLDS THE SAME PRINCIPLE THAT FOODS TASTE BETTER 
and there's more fun in eating in the open air. But the crude fire has been 
replaced by the modem charcoal or electric barbecue unit. Today's utensils 
are most likely modern designs in stainless steel. 






continued from page 1* 

The Center, witn (b students averag- 
ing in age from 16-18 enrolled this 
summer, will be a year after year 
operation with a goal of £00 stu- 
dents set for future summers,, 

Dr* Schuler was delighted with 
the attendance at the weekly con- 
certs conducted by the students of 
the center, and feels that this very 
promising project is going to draw 
much favorable attention to the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts and to the 
town nf Amherst* 

TO TOUR EUROPE 

Exceptional students of this 
fear's school are going to tour Eur- 
ope next summer with "KIDS PROM 
HOME" an internationally famous 
group of non-professionals, xne Am- 
herst Summer Music Center is expec- 
ted to be a drafting devise for 
this organization* 

"The School, which offers all 
phases of musical instruction and 
interpretation has great potential* 
Parents and music teachers at home 
should feel deeply gratified with 
the progress made by the students," 
said Dr* Schuler* "It is a tribute 
to these people, the fine work they 
have done, and the musical instruc- 
tion received prior to enrolling in 
ASMC . " 

Students at the ASMC felt over- 
whelmingly, that the school was 
filled with difficult work and fun, 
but expressed a desire to return 
next year* They felt that the in- 
struction they received was vastly 
more complex and different than any 
which they had previously been ex- 
posed to, and would highly recommend 
the school* Although the school was 
hard, exposure to activities, like 
sports and parties, as well as trips 
to Tanglewood and other spots of mu- 
sical interest, offered variety to 
the ASMC program* 

FIEDLER ON ADVISORY BOARD 

ASMC is the second least expen- 
sive school of 181 such schools in 
the country* On its advisory coun- 
cil, ASMC has such distinguished 
persons as Dr. Jean Paul Mather, Pre- 
sident of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, Fred Waring, Dr. Sigmund 
Spaeth, and Arthur Fiedler, conduc- 
tor of the Boston Pops Orchestra. 

rart or zne outstanding faculty 
at ASMC this season was N Q rman Clou- 
tier, NBC staff director and arran- 
ger; Harry Huffna/rle, international- 



The Suramer Collegian 
Page 6 

ly famous arranger with top dance 
bands; Alvin Etler, Smith College 
faculty member of composing promin- 
ance; Dr, Fred Mirliani, Head of 
the Holy Cross music department; 
Chester Hazlett, formerly with Paul 
Whitman and currently orchestrating 
at NBC; and Emil Hubert, formerly 
with the NbC sympnony* 



continued from page 2* 

"The University community has 
been saddened by the passing of Pre- 
sident Emeritus Ralph Van Meter* Dr* 
Van Meter, a thoroughly trained sci- 
entist, was also firmly committed to 
the need for liberal education* On© 
of his favorite sayings was the aim 
of higher education should be to de- 
velop students from a broad base to 
a sharp point* In laying a firm ba- 
sis for the growth of the University 
he was particularly skilled in bring- 
ing outstanding persons to join the 
staff* For example, the President 
of the University, J. Paul Mather * 
was chosen by Dr.Van Meter to serve 
as provost* Dr* Van Meter was an 
extremelyl^iendly person whose wise 
counsel was treasured by students 
and faculty alike* The growth and 
development of the University in re- 
cent years and the planned expansion 
of the future are tributes to his 
judgment of the needs for higher ed- 
ucation for the people of the Com- 
monwealth. 



continued from page 3* 

Richardson earned his B«S. at 
AIC, Springfield, and M*S. at the 
University. 

Two graduates of A m erican Inter- 
national College will be teaching 
associates while working on grad- 
uate degrees in physics. They are 
Philip A. Braica and Theodore J* 

Meyers* 

Appointments to the chemistry de- 
partment include James S. Proctor 
and Oliver T. Zajicek. Appointed as 
assistant professor, Proctor earned 
his Ph.D. at the University of Rome, 
Italy under a Fulbright grant. Ap- 
pointed as instructor, Zajicek is a 
graduate of B a ldwin-Wallace College, 
earned his master's degree at Wayne 
State University where he is com- 
pleting requirements for his Ph.D* 
decree© 














Ljmomm©r 












I 




r^i 



University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 




VOLUME I 



\ 



August 25, 1958 



NUMBER 10 



TONIGHT IS A BIG NIGHT ON WEDK RADIO 

An example of Pour College Co- 
operation in action can be heard to- 
night when highlights of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts June gradua- 
tion exercises are broadcast simul- 
taneously in Boston and Western 
Massachusetts©. 

The recorded commencement of Dr. 
Paul A, Siple, scientist - explorer 
of the South Pole, will be broad- 
cast on Pioneer Valley Lectures at 
7:30 p.m. over the Educational Radio 
Network (E.R.N.) 

MOST POWERFUL FM STATION IN VALLEY 

Pioneer Valley Lectures is pro- 
duced for the network by WEDK, 91.7 
mc FM, a Four College Cooperative 
venture in conjunction with the 
Springfield School Committee. The 
Connecticut Valley 1 s most powerful 
FM station (1^,000 watts), WEDK has 
been serving listeners on a regular 
basis since August U. 

continued on page 2 

HELP WAITED II I 

A YOUNG AND LOVELY SCOTTISH LASS WOULD 
LIKE A RIDE TO THE WE8T COAST, HER GOAL 
IS CALIFORNIA, CAN YOU HELP??? 

PHONE ALPINE 3-3783 AND ASK FOR ANNE 
C0L0JJH0UN, PRONOUNCED (kn - boon) 



MORE REMARKABLE THAN EVER: RADIO 



In the midst of this 
age, millions of people a 
covering radio. Millions 
been enjoying radio all a 
it is stilH a miracle to 
that by merely turning 
can hear the President of 
a Beethoven symphony.. • 
game ■ • . the Academy Award 
tions and truly amazing 
happening in radio today: 



television 
re re-dis- 

more have 
long, for 
most of us 
a dial you 

the U.S., 
a baseball 

presenta- 
things are 



RIGHT HERE IN THE BAY STATE 

In Massachusetts, not far from 
Harvard University, stands a gigan- 
tic radio that can tune in sounds 
created before the first man walked 
c i earthl The n programs M it receives 
were originally made when celestial 
bodies — millions of light years 
away ~ collided in space. Because 
of the enormous distance they have 
had to travel, their sound waves are 
just now reaching earth. 

A new science, radio astronomy, 
waa born in 191*8 when the first ra- 
dio "star" — a heavenly body that 
radiates sound on radio frequencies 
was discovered. Mow almost 500 such 
stars are kno;;n to exist. 

continued on pfi^e 3 









continued from page 1* 

ADMINISTRATION AT HASBROUCK LAB 

The transmitter is located in 
Springfield while the program and 
administrative office is located on 
campus at Hasbrouck Laboratory. 

WEDK is operated with the advice 
and cooperation of the Western Mass. 
Broadcasting Council. Besides the 
U of M, other college members are 
Amherst, Mt. Holyoke and Smith. 

As a key affiliate of E.R.N, , 
WEDK will carry many of WGEH-FM f s 
programs from Boston, including the 
Boston Symphony Concerts recorded 
at Tanglewood and programs of news 
and news analysis by Louis. M. Lyons, 
curator of the Nieman Fellowships 
at Harvard University and national 
winner of the 1957 Peabody Award 
for radio and television reporting. 

"SERIOUS BROADCASTING" 

This cooperative enterprise 
bi ings to the area for the first 
time a non- commercial radio station 
devoted exclusively to "serious 
broadcasting". "Serious broadcast- 
ing" is defined by WEDK as a term 
that includes not oily formal cour^ej 



The Sumner Collegian 
Page 2 

for adult education but also cultur- 
al and informational programs pre- 
sented on a higher level than usual- 
ly found on commercial radio or 
television. 

ZAITZ IS COORDINATOR 
Radio Coordinator for the U of M 
is Anthony W. Zaitz, Assistant Pro- 



fessor of Speech, 
will develop and 
for WEDK and the 
Network utilizing 
resources of the 



Professor Zaitz 
produce programs 

Educational Radio 
the faculty and 

University. MR. 






ZAITZ EXPECTS TO MAKE USE OP THE 
PRODUCTION TALENT AND TECHNICAL FA- 
CILITIES OF WMUA, THE STUDENT -OPER- 
ATED CAMPUS RADIO STATION. 

This summer Prof. Zaitz produced 
a four-week radio series on the Am- 
erican Humanities Seminar which met 
on campus July 14-16. The seminar 
was sponsored by the Humanities Cen- 
ter for Liberal Education and the 
University of Massachusetts. The 
series was broadcast on Pioneer Val- 
ley Lectures over the Educational 
Radio Network. 







This is one of the many jazz groups here at UMass, now 
with an opportunity to reach thousands of additional lis- 
teners through the new WMUA -WEDK radio hookup. 



I 






R COLLEOIAN 
OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
RJBLISHED EACH MONDAY OF 

Big summer SCHOOL SESSION 

EDITOR *•••«••••,.»«•• *JOEL WQLF801 

TYPIST .......NANCY PARKKR 

REPORTER .RILL HOGARTH 

continued from page 1 

RADIO TELESCOPE 

Major tool of this new science 
is the radio telescope, whose half- 
ton antenna can pick y 
ton antenna can pick up invisible 
radiations from the sun, stars, ga- 
laxies and other celestial bodies 
in the same way that household ra- 
dios pick up programs. 

Because of the similarity of ra- 
dio waves and light waves, a radio 
astronomer can do far more than 
merely listen to this stellar sta- 
tic* He can view heavenly objects 
and plot their position in space by 
radio "light". 

Result: we 1 re getting a "map" of 
our universe.The importance of such 
knowledge for future flights through 
space is obvious. 

Yet none of this would have been 
possible if, back in 1865, Scottish 
scientist James C. Maxwell hadn't 
discovered that light waves were 
both electric and magnetic. In 1888, 
Heinrich Hertz, a German, succeeded 
in generating electromagnetic waves 
or radio impulses • Later, Sir Oliver 
Lodge and other scientists experi- 
mented with the Hertzian waves as a 
medium of communication. 

MARCONI INVENTS 

These investigations led to the 
experiments of Italian Guglielmo 
Marconi, who, in l89lj-, made a set of 
instruments that could actually 
send and receive messages. Two years 
later, he sent a radio message from 
ship to shore . The first interna- 
tional radio communication was ac- 
complished in 1899, when a message 
was sent across the English Channel. 
In 1901, a message was transmitted 
from England to Newfoundland. 

WORLD SERIES AIRED 

Improvements came so rapidly, 
that by 1921 it was possible to hear 
the New York Giants beat the New 
York Yankees in the World Series 
without leaving home. 



'I H 



Pac« 



3 



The 20 f s were also the heyday of 
the crystal set, a crude but ingen- 
ious radio with a weak operating 
radius (2£-£0 miles). 

It wasn't long before Americans 
rebelled at the idea of having to 
sit huddled about the radio to get 
their long-distance entertainment, 
so a "portable"radio was introduced. 
It weighed 90 lbs.(i|l lbs. for bat- 
teries alone) and measured 3 ft. x 
1 1/2 ft. x 1 ft. It looked like a 
suitcase but was far more fragile. 
Technically, the "portable" was port- 
able — if you had a weightlifter in 
the family. 



THE PORTABLE 



Few people did. Consequently, 
the portable radio slipped into tem- 
porary obscurity. But in 1937 the 
makers of Eveready batteries per- 
fected something that started the 
portable radio boom. Using an en- 
tirely new principal of design, they 
made a radio battery smaller than 
anybody had been able to make be- 
fore. Using the same principle, 
they've been turning them out pro- 
gressively smaller until today some 
of their batteries are no longer 
than a cigarette, others no bigger 
than a shirt buttoni It's estimated 
that over 20 million portables now 
bring music, drama and news to Amer- 
icans outdoors and in. 

Radio roally came into its own 
as entertainment in the 1920' s, with 
the great popularity of the early 
Amos and Andy show. Those comedians 
paved the way for r future laughs 
brought on by Ed Wynn, Jack Benny, 
Fred Allen, Bob Hope and Red Skel- 
ton. 

It wasn't long before the major 
networks, realizing their responsi- 
bilities to the public, scheduled 
news programs, variety shows, spe- 
cial events, political coverage, 
drama, symphonies and opera as well 
as popular music and comedy -—-to 
suit every conceivable taste. 

AND TODAY 

Even today, despite the inroads 
of television, 15>0 million people 
listen to radio at least 20 hours a 
week. Most loyal fans are those be- 
tween 20 and 3^ yrs. of age. Favor- 
ite listening time is from noon to 
6 p.m. Peak listening hour is be- 
tween 4. and 5 P«m. 



KOZLOWSKI OP BOTANY DEPARTMENT LEAVES 
FOR NEW POST AT WISCONSIN 

Dr. Theodore T. Kozlowski, pro- 
fessor of botany and head of the de- 
partment, has resigned to accept a 
professorship at the University of 
Wisconsin. His new position in grad- 
uate teaching and research is effec- 
tive Sept. lo 

Dr. Kozlowski has been on the 
University staff since 191+7 and was 
promoted to head of the department 
in 1950# 

He is co-author of a manuscript 
on "Physiology of Woody Plants" to 
be published by McGraw Hill Book Co. 

He is chairman of the Northeast 
Section of the Botanical Society of 
America and chairman of the North- 
east Section, American Society of 
Plant Physiologists. 

Dr. Kozlowski earned his bachel- 
or 1 s degree at Syracuse University* 
master's and doctorate at Duke Univ- 
ersity. 

He also attended MIT and the 
University of Buffalo. 

Other professional affiliations 
include membership in the New York 
Academy of Science, American Insti- 
tute of Biological Scientists. 



The Summer Collegian 
Page 4 




REGARLESS OF HOW YOU LOOK AT IT. 
THERE IS NOTHING QUITE LIKE .RADIO 




PICTURED ABOVE IS COLLEGE POND ' r ITH THE UNION IN THE BACKR0U71D. THE POND IS BEING CLEANED 

OUT AND ACCORDING TO HARRY HUGILL, CONSTRUCTION MAINTENANCE ENGINEER AT THE UNIVERSITY, 

T^E JOB SHOULD BE DONE AND THE POND FILLED AGAIN BY THE END OF SEPTEMBER, WEATHER PERMITTING.